Only CORD leaders will access IEBC offices, not supporters – Police

April 25, 2016 12:08 pm
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Nairobi Police Chief however warns that no huge number of supporters will be given access during the planned presentation at the IEBC headquarters at Anniversary Towers, over the Okoa Kenya signatures/FILE
Nairobi Police Chief however warns that no huge number of supporters will be given access during the planned presentation at the IEBC headquarters at Anniversary Towers, over the Okoa Kenya signatures/MIKE KARIUKI

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 25 – Police will only allow a few CORD leaders to present their grievances to the Independent Electoral Boundaries Commission offices in order to allow other Kenyans seeking services to be served.

Nairobi Police Chief however warns that no huge number of supporters will be given access during the planned presentation at the IEBC headquarters at Anniversary Towers, over the Okoa Kenya signatures.

Overview
  • According to the IEBC, CORD’s Okoa Kenya Secretariat had earlier been invited during the voter registration verification process, an invitation they had not yet honoured.
  • Even after the commission rendered Okoa Kenya’s voter register unlawful, IEBC Communications and Public Affairs Manager Andrew Limo said the commission was in constant communication with the CORD secretariat.

“We are not going to allow anybody to eject the officials from their offices,” he warned. “Please be advised, any nonsense will not be allowed.”

“This is a public office and any Kenyan is free to come and get services from this office. If two, three Kenyans appear, there is no problem but not 50 people.”

Police have since been directed to facilitate access to the leaders according to Koome but with exemption of their followers.

“Let no one lie to himself that he can intimidate anyone in this city,” a visibly irritated Koome said. “As the County Commander, I want the residents of this city to enjoy their lives. Don’t wake up one morning and start intimidating me.”

He complained that the opposition leaders, though required by law, had not notified the authorities of their intentions to hold a protest.

Koome advised the disgruntled leaders to use constitutional means to address their complaints.

“We have not been notified…Why should one think he can do whatever he wants?” he asked. “That will be setting a wrong precedent. We have law governing this country.”

He was speaking during a press briefing outside IEBC offices on Monday morning where he warned against any attempt to cause mayhem, saying the perpetrators will be dealt with firmly.

The County police boss also cautioned political leaders against making offensive remarks that may lead to loss of lives or destruction of property.

“As we move ahead, leaders should be careful over what they say or do,” he said. “We are beyond being intimidated. We are ready and whoever attempts will face the full force of the law.”

IEBC on Sunday told the Coalition for Reforms and Democracy that it will not take orders from anybody and instead observe the law, which also provides for its independence from external interference in its work.

“The commission expects CORD and all citizens to uphold the rule of law as it demands the same of others. It will hold steadfast to the law and render fair and just decisions,” reads a statement from the electoral body.

According to the IEBC, CORD’s Okoa Kenya Secretariat had earlier been invited during the voter registration verification process, an invitation they had not yet honoured.

Even after the commission rendered Okoa Kenya’s voter register unlawful, IEBC Communications and Public Affairs Manager Andrew Limo said the commission was in constant communication with the CORD secretariat.

“The commission had advised the Okoa secretariat to send its technical team of experts to meet with ours to acquaint itself with the methodology used in the verification process. However this has not happened,” Limo explained.

He said the commission had its doors open for constructive discussions but not destructive arguments likely to interfere with its work.

“Such engagement is expected to be in a structured and organised manner devoid of intimidation, threats or malicious orchestrations and demonstration,” Limo said.

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