The Seven: Times humanity prevailed over a terror attacks

In the face of adversity, it is integral that people unite and spread some love.

1.Christchurch shootings in New Zealand

Following the recent Christchurch shootings, many people have come together not only to condemn the killings but to also offer support for the affected. The Christchurch mosque shootings were two consecutive terrorist attacks at mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, during Friday Masjid prayers on 15 March 2019, 50 people were killed, 50 others were injured and the gunman took to Facebook to stream the attack.

Some Christians on social media put up pictures of themselves with posters saying ‘I will keep watch while my brothers pray’ was one of the many signs of support. The picture of the New Zealand prime minister wearing a hijab was projected on the world’s tallest building, the Burj al Khalifa in Dubai, UAE.

2.Riverside Attack

The 2019 DusitD2 complex attack as reported by The Sauce, was a terrorist attack that occurred from 15th to 16th January 2019 in the Westlands area of Nairobi, Kenya, which left more than 20 people dead. After the attack, Kenyans came together to offer each other love and support on social media. Civilian gun holders and other security forces including a lone British special forces officer aided in the rescue operations. An elderly woman who woke up early morning on the 16th to offer the security teams who had worked all through the night breakfast also warmed the hearts of many.

The show of resilience by Kenyans on social media drove the conversation from a victim standpoint that gave Al Shabaab power by spreading terror to a survivor point of view that showcased that Kenyans will not be cowered with the hashtags #WeShallOvercome and #WeHaveOvercome. True to this we overcame and we are stronger than ever.

3.Garissa University Attack

On 2 April 2015, gunmen stormed the Garissa University College in Garissa, Kenya, killing 148 people, and injuring 79 more. The militant group and Al-Qaeda offshoot, Al-Shabaab, which the gunmen claimed to be from, took responsibility for the attack.

Following this attack, Zagreb University students in Croatia commemorated the death of 147 students killed by Al Shabaab terrorists in Garissa on 2nd April. The 147 students lay outside the Croatian National Theatre in Zagreb for 147 seconds. The performance, which started at 14:07 pm, aimed to highlight that the terror act in Garissa did not receive sufficient coverage in the international media.

Ater the surviving students received counseling after the attack, the university which was a constituent of Moi University, transferred the students to the Eldoret campus for them to be able to finish their education.

4.Mandera Bus Attack

Abdirashid Aden, a young and brave high school student, was among injured passengers during the Mandera bus attack by suspected Al-Shabaab militants, after he defended his Christian friend sitting next to him. The bus was traveling from Nairobi to Mandera November 15, 2015, before it came under attack, among those who died was a teacher and hero Salah Farah who also defended 2 Christians in the bus but later died of gunshot wounds at Kenyatta Hospital. A group of Kenyan Muslims traveling on a bus ambushed by Islamist gunmen protected Christian passengers by refusing to be split into groups. They told the militants “to kill them together or leave them alone”.

The 2015 Mandera bus attack that was immortalized in a film Watu Wote: All of Us won a student Oscar. The short film that was produced in 2016 as the graduation film for the Hamburg Media School master class program, won the Student Oscars. Katja Benrath from the media school who won the narrative category for the short film stated that it was a tribute to the 28 people killed by Al-Shabab militants who attacked the bus.

5.Charlie Hebdo shooting in Paris

On 7 January 2015, two brothers, Saïd and Chérif Kouachi, forced their way into the offices of the French satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris. Armed with rifles and other weapons, they killed 12 people and injured 11 others. The gunmen identified themselves as belonging to the Islamist terrorist group Al-Qaeda’s branch in Yemen, which took responsibility for the attack. Several related attacks followed in the Île-de-France region on 7–9 January 2015, including the Hypercacher kosher supermarket siege where a terrorist held 19 hostages, of whom he murdered 4 Jews.

On 11 January, about two million people, including more than 40 world leaders, met in Paris for a rally of national unity, and 3.7 million people joined demonstrations across France. The phrase ‘Je Suis Charlie’ became a common slogan of support at the rallies and on social media. The staff of Charlie Hebdo continued with the publication, and the following issue print ran 7.95 million copies in six languages, compared to its typical print run of 60,000 in only French.

6.Westgate Attack

On Saturday, 21 September 2013, four masked gunmen attacked the Westgate shopping mall, an upscale mall in Nairobi, Kenya. The attack resulted in 71 total deaths, including 62 civilians, five Kenyan soldiers, and four attackers. Approximately 200 people were wounded in the mass shooting. The extremist Islamic group al-Shabaab claimed responsibility for the incident, which it characterized as retribution for the Kenyan military’s deployment in the group’s home country of Somalia popularly known as ‘Operation Linda Nichi.’

Following the attack, Kenyans came together and thousands of people turned out to support those affected by the devastating Westgate Shopping Mall attack by giving blood at Kenya Red Cross Society donation drives. A blood drive held at Uhuru Park saw nearly 3,000 units collected in one day alone.

7.Manchester Arena Bombing in the United Kingdom

The Manchester Arena bombing was a suicide bombing attack in Manchester, the United Kingdom on 22 May 2017. A radical Islamist detonated a shrapnel-laden homemade bomb as people were leaving the Manchester Arena following a concert by the American singer Ariana Grande. The incident was treated as an act of terrorism. Twenty-three people died, including the attacker, and 139 were wounded, more than half of them children. Several hundred more suffered psychological trauma. The bomber was Salman Ramadan Abedi, a 22-year-old local man of Libyan ancestry. The incident was the deadliest terrorist attack and the first suicide bombing in Britain since the 7 July 2005 London bombings.

The ‘We Love Manchester Emergency Fund’ raised more than £5.57m after the attack and become a charity to ensure that funds can be distributed effectively to those injured and bereaved by the bombing at Manchester Arena. Ariana was back in Manchester a week after to headlined a benefit show for 50,000 fans at Old Trafford cricket ground, just two miles away from the arena.

 

 

 

 

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