Prince Harry took over the National Geographic Instagram, and it was pretty dope - The Sauce
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Prince Harry took over the National Geographic Instagram, and it was pretty dope

Prince Harry edited the National Geographic’s Instagram account for a day.

The 35-year-old prince took charge of the publication’s social media account on Monday (30.09.19) to launch a campaign called Looking Up, on which he will work with the magazine’s photographers to highlight indigenous trees and how vital they are for life on earth.

Harry asked Instagram users to share their own pictures of trees from around the world and also share an image taken in Liwonde National Park, Malawi, where he is unveiling two initiatives to help preserve trees in the area as part of his current official visit to Africa with wife Duchess Meghan and their four-month-old son Archie.

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We are pleased to announce that today The Duke of Sussex is guest-editing the @NatGeo Instagram account! This photo of a Boabab tree was taken by The Duke in Liwonde National Park, Malawi (where he has just unveiled two new Queens Commonwealth Canopy initiatives) and as part of the ‘Looking Up’ campaign in partnership with @NatGeo. • You can join in today by sharing your own images of the trees in your local community using the hashtag #LookingUp As the Duke shared: “Looking Up” is a new social media initiative to raise awareness of the vital role trees play in the earth’s eco-system, and an opportunity for all of us to take a moment, to appreciate the beauty of our surroundings and to share your own view, by looking up!” • We invite you to follow along at @NatGeo and to share photos you take of trees in your local community using the hashtag #LookingUp so we can all celebrate the importance of the role we play as a community in protecting nature. At the end of the day, The Duke will share a selection of the most beautiful images from across the world on @SussexRoyal Instagram stories. The Duke’s passion for trees and forests as nature’s simple solution to the environmental issues we face, has been inspired by the years of work he has been doing on behalf of his grandmother, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and The Queens Commonwealth Canopy.🌳🌲 • The ‘QCC’ @QueensCanopy was launched in 2015, when Commonwealth countries were invited to submit forests and national parks or plant trees to preserve in The Queen’s name. Now, almost 50 countries are taking part and have already dedicated indigenous forest for conservation, or have committed to planting millions of new trees to help combat climate change. #lookingup #forestsforthefuture #sussexroyal #treesfortomorrow Photo © The Duke of Sussex / 2nd by @africanparksnetwork

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Harry’s passion for trees and forests is “inspired by the work he does on behalf of his grandmother, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.”

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The Prince has launched 15 of the Queens Commonwealth Canopy (QCC) projects across the world since it began in 2015, when Commonwealth countries were invited to submit areas of greenery or plant trees to preserve in the monarch’s name, with almost 50 countries taking part.

Here are two of the most beautiful images shared onto the NatGeo Instagram.

This is from the National Arboretum in Gloucestershire, England.

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Photo by @simoncroberts | “The autumn colours in the U.K. are always beautiful, and I just had to include something to show them off. Thanks to Simon Roberts for sharing this. It was taken at the National Arboretum, which makes it even more special.” —Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal Selected by The Duke for the #LookingUp campaign with @natgeo, Simon’s image was taken at the National Arboretum, in Gloucestershire, England, which is a year-round centre of remembrance for those who have served their country. Please keep sharing your own #LookingUp images from your own community, and at the end of the day The Duke will be sharing some of his favourites on @sussexroyal Instagram stories. … Today, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal is guest-editing the @natgeo feed, in an effort to raise awareness around Queens Commonwealth Canopy, in which almost 50 countries have dedicated indigenous forest for conservation or have committed to planting millions of new trees to combat climate change. The images being posted today are all ‘looking up’ at trees from below to highlight the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem. Post your images of trees, add #lookingup, and at the end of the day, The Duke will share a selection of images that you post from across the world on @sussexroyal Instagram stories

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This is from MacMillan Provincial Park in Cathedral Grove, British Columbia, Canada.

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Photo by @ismailferdous | “This stunning shot from Ismail Ferdous shows the real beauty of a Canadian forest canopy—I thought it was breathtaking. I love being able to share these images with everyone, and hopefully get more people #LookingUp.” –Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal This photo was taken in MacMillan Provincial Park in Cathedral Grove, British Columbia, Canada. … Today The Duke of Sussex is guest-editing the @natgeo feed, part of an effort to raise awareness around the Queens Commonwealth Canopy, in which almost 50 countries have dedicated indigenous forest for conservation or have committed to planting millions of new trees to combat climate change. The images posted today are all ‘looking up’ at trees from below to highlight the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem. Post your images of trees, add #lookingup, and at the end of the day, The Duke will share a selection of the most beautiful images that you post from across the world on @sussexroyal Instagram stories.

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This is an image of an indigenous strangler fig tree from Yidney Scrub Rainforest.

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Photo by @peteressick | “I absolutely love this from Peter Essick. It is a stunning view of a strangler fig as it twists around another tree to head upwards toward the sun, precisely why it got its name! Thanks for sharing this, Peter, and for #LookingUp” – Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal Peter’s image was taken in the Yidney Scrub Rainforest on Fraser Island, Australia. Today The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal is guest-editing the @natgeo feed, in an effort to raise awareness around Queens Commonwealth Canopy, in which almost 50 countries have dedicated indigenous forests for conservation or have committed to planting millions of new trees to combat climate change. The images being posted today are all ‘looking up’ at trees from below to highlight the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem. Post your images of trees, add the #lookingup, and at the end of the day, The Duke will share a selection of the most beautiful images that you post from across the world on @sussexroyal Instagram stories.

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During Harry’s tour, there will be two other national parks committing to the project, as well as tree planting with schoolchildren in Botswana.

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News of Harry’s Instagram campaign came after he urged people to boost their efforts to safeguard the planet and warned humans need to learn from past mistakes and overcome “greed, apathy and selfishness” to protect the world.

He wrote in the Daily Telegraph newspaper: “This may well sound hippy to some. But we cannot afford to have a “them or us” mentality. Humans and animals and their habitats fundamentally need to co-exist or within the next 10 years, our problems across the globe will become even more unmanageable.

“Nature teaches us the importance of a circular system, one where nothing goes to waste and everything has a role to play. If we interfere with it, rather than work with it, the system will break down.

“Conservation used to be a specialist area, driven by science.

“But now it is fundamental to our survival and we must overcome greed, apathy, and selfishness if we are to make real progress.”

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