Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

top
Capital News
Designed to enable rapid large-scale development and deployment, the easy-to-use Bridge Mechanical Ventilator has been made from locally sourced components which can be easily replicated to avert the COVID-19 pandemic/FILE/AFP

Capital Health

Car manufacturer unveils mechanical ventilator to support COVID-19 war

NAIROBI, Kenya, April 25 – Automobile assembling firm, Toyota Kenya, has developed a Bridge Mechanical Ventilator as an emergency use resuscitator system to support patients with COVID-19 respiratory failure.

The firm’s Managing Director, Arvinder Reel said the car manufacturer had taken up the call by President Uhuru Kenyatta for local companies to come up with easy-to-deploy local solutions in the battle to contain the spread of coronavirus.

“It is recognized that the surge in COVID-19 is requiring extraordinary measures that include the provision of mechanical ventilator support to keep pace with clinical need at our healthcare facilities,” said Reel.

Designed to enable rapid large-scale development and deployment, the easy-to-use Bridge Mechanical Ventilator has been made from locally sourced components which can be easily replicated to avert the COVID-19 pandemic.

The automobile assembler is now awaiting the necessary approvals to be able to develop up to 20 Bridge Mechanical Ventilators per day.

The ventilator support needs of a COVID-19 patient can range from simple BIPAP (bi-level positive airway pressure) for patients that are breathing spontaneously to mandatory ventilation in either a pressure-support or volume control mode.

Some of the symptoms that COVID-19 Patients develop include fever and dry cough, while others find themselves unable to breathe.

But in most severe cases, one biomedical device becomes indispensable: the ventilator. 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

According to the University of Technology in Sydney in Australia, the ventilator is the difference between life and death for people with severe covid-19.

In critical COVID-19 infections, a patient’s lungs become so damaged they can no longer breathe.

To remedy this, doctors use the ventilator which takes control of breathing; it mixes oxygen with air, warming the gas and pushing it into the lungs. Its static, mechanical thrums count out each breath. 

Global estimates suggest around 5 per cent of COVID-19 patients will require intensive care involving a ventilator. Ventilator shortages in the worst-hit nations, such as Italy, have already forced health care workers to choose who gets to live. 

The pandemic is inspiring a wave of innovation and rapid development of new and improved ventilation devices that could be key to keeping the coronavirus in check until a vaccine or effective, standardized treatment comes along. 

Of worth to note are efforts by 16 Kenyatta University students who came up with a low-cost ventilator prototype to help in the fight against COVID-19.

The students took up the initiative after it was established the country could face a shortage of ventilator machines should critical virus cases spike.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisement

More on Capital News