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Prof Atwoli quits School of Medicine deanship at Moi University

Prof Atwoli (pictured) cited the stagnation of staff in the School of Medicine that had met criteria for promotion, and recurrent industrial arrest as among reasons he was quitting the post/FILE – RESEARCH GATE

By Juliet Omelo: NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 8 – Moi University’s School of Medicine Dean, Professor Lukoye Atwoli has vacated the office, a year before his term comes to an end.

“I would like to take this opportunity to inform you that today I handed in letters giving notice of my early retirement from the Office of Dean, School of Medicine, with immediate effect,” Prof Atwoli wrote in the letter addressed to the university’s administration.

Prof Atwoli cited the stagnation of staff in the School of Medicine that had met criteria for promotion, and recurrent industrial arrest as among reasons he was quitting the post.

In his letter the Dean cited some of his achievements while in office saying his greatest pride as a mental health advocate was the development of the Masters of Science in Clinical Psychology that will see further career progression for graduates that have undertaken Bachelors of Science in Medical Psychology Programme.

“Concerning research, I presided over one of the largest health research enterprises in the region, perhaps only bettered by KEMRI and the University of Nairobi. At a personal level I have brought over Sh100 million to the region in research grants, including the massive study on the genetics of Psychotic Disorders in Africa,” he enumerated.

“I also participate in the OSCAR study that has over the past ten years brought in over KES 300 million. We have expanded our research footprint in HIV/AIDS, as well as in chronic diseases Cancer, Diabetes, Hypertension and Mental disorders. The School leads others in the University in research output as evidenced by the regular reports from the Directorate of Research,” he added.

Prof Atwoli said he no longer enjoys the confidence and support of the faculty members following their refusal to attend meetings.

“The past 18 months have been particularly trying for me, with recurrent strikes affecting either the hospital or the school, and often both institutions,” he said.

“The latest work boycott concerning non-payment of enhanced clinical allowances means that our final year medical students have lost close to two years before graduation, and without urgent action there is no hope of resolution,” Prof Atwoli noted.

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“I have done everything in my power to help resolve this matter and regularize teaching and learning, but success has been elusive.”

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