City Hall says Sh400 parking fee to be charged on motorists accessing the CBD only

August 14, 2019 (2 weeks ago) 5:28 pm
The Bill has proposed four zones within the county with charges for Zone II (Parklands, Westlands, Upperhill) set at Sh300, Sh200 for zone III (Muthurwa and areas near city center) and Sh100 for Zone IV which includes all residential areas/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Jul 14 – Nairobi’s Finance Bill 2019 has proposed the zoning of the city into four with motorists accessing the Central Business District (CBD) clustered as Zone I expected Sh400 in daily parking fees.

Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko on Wednesday clarified that the proposed review increasing the parking fees from the current Sh200 will only affect those accessing the CBD.

The Bill has proposed four zones within the county with charges for Zone II (Parklands, Westlands, Upperhill) set at Sh300, Sh200 for zone III (Muthurwa and areas near city center) and Sh100 for Zone IV which includes all residential areas.

The increase in parking in the CBD is aimed at increasing revenue collection as well as reducing congestion.

Parking fees are among major revenue streams for the county and the increment is part of the measures to address dismal performance in revenue collection in the last financial year.

Sonko has further said the Executive and the Assembly’s Budget Committee will re-look some of the proposals and make resolutions which are fair to city residents.

Last week the Kenya Alliance of Residents Association (KARA) asked City Hall to drop some of the clauses contained in the Nairobi Finance Bill 2019 on the basis that they are imposing punitive charges to the already burdened taxpayers.

Newly proposed charges include Sh2,000 for an annual fire certificate for households, fire inspection fee per visit and solid management charges for residential houses.

The Bill also proposes an inspection fee of Sh1,000 to be charged on Nairobi residents keeping dogs or cats.

The health inspection fee is among new levies aimed raising Sh17.32 billion from the county’s internal revenue collection to finance its budget.

Some activists have however gone to court seeking to stop the county government from passing the Bill into law, arguing that there was no public participation.

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