Reject questionable money, religious institutions challenged

October 8, 2018 (2 weeks ago) 3:58 pm
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“It is high time we called corruption for what it is. Corruption is theft; theft of opportunities, theft of finances, theft of time. And anyone who engages in corruption is, therefore, a thief and should face the full consequences of the law,” he said/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Oct 8 – Giving is a virtue but religious institutions in the country has been asked to be cautious.

This comes in the wake of criticism by a section of Kenyans who think cash, more so from politicians should not be received without questioning.

Bishop John Warari, a member of the multi-sectoral forum against corruption says it is a challenge religious institutions will have to deal with to ensure money looted from public coffers don’t find its way to the altar.

“It is a very hard decision but one that is very important. But we as a nation must agree that we have been sick,” Bishop Warari said on Monday.

He was speaking during the forum’s press briefing against corruption where Kenyans were asked to take charge of the fight in a bid to complement government efforts.

Politicians posing as philanthropists continues to give “cheerfully” to such institutions, but the man of the cloth was categorical that suspicious money should be outrightly rejected.

Other stakeholders who spoke during the event committed to ensure the menace, which is blamed for a 30 per cent loss of the national budget, amounting to billions of shillings every financial year is eliminated.

Led by KEPSA Foundation Vice-Chairperson Patrick Obath, they called for “a self-reflection” in all sectors whether in private or public and identify all forms of corruption that may exist.

This, he said, should be a month-long exercise ahead of next month’s National Anti-Corruption Conference.

“It is high time we called corruption for what it is. Corruption is theft; theft of opportunities, theft of finances, theft of time. And anyone who engages in corruption is, therefore, a thief and should face the full consequences of the law,” he said.

He attributed the rise in cases of corruption to “degradation of our value system that has taken root within our nation.”

The Association of Professional Societies in East Africa chairperson Irene Wanyoike cautioned their 20,000 members against engaging in corruption saying they will risk being blacklisted.

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