Ruto underscores importance of agriculture in alleviating poverty in Africa

September 16, 2018 (6 days ago) 1:41 pm
Shares
Ruto said Africa is endowed with rich agricultural soils whose potentiality could transform the lives of its people if it is exploited to the maximum/dpps

, OYO, Congo Brazzaville, Sep 16 – Agriculture holds key in the development and prosperity of the African Continent by helping to alleviate poverty and achieve food security, Deputy President William Ruto has said.

Ruto said Africa is endowed with rich agricultural soils whose potentiality could transform the lives of its people if it is exploited to the maximum.

Speaking after a tour of Kila Ranch in Oyo region, Republic of Congo, on invitation of President Denis Sassou -Nguesso, on Saturday, Ruto said the agricultural sector plays a strategic role in the process of economic development of a country.

The Deputy President said Kenya has identified agriculture in its Big Four agenda under food security as a key driver to spur the country’s economic growth.

“In fact, 50 percent of Kenya’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) comes from the agricultural sector. As a country, we know that it is through the development of this sector that we can achieve food security which is part of our Big Four agenda,” said Ruto.

The Deputy President said the Republic of Congo whose agricultural sector contributes 10 percent to its GDP could learn a lot from Kenya on how the sector could be made a powerful engine for its economic growth.

“Sharing of ideas between Kenya and the Republic of Congo is significant. There is a lot we can learn and share from each other on mutual issues of development especially in the fields of agriculture and livestock development,” said Ruto.

He said the development of the agricultural sector has the power to initiate and catalyze inclusive economic transformations of all citizens irrespective of their backgrounds.

Ruto who was with President Sassoungueso said unless the African governments prioritized the development of the agricultural sector, the region would continue importing food for its increasing population.

Shares

Latest Articles

News Podcasts

Most Viewed