Miguna to blame for his woes: Odinga

May 20, 2018 12:36 pm
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Miguna Miguna administered the oath taken by Raila Odinga as the People’s President/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, May 20 – Opposition leader Raila Odinga has said that embattled lawyer Miguna Miguna is to blame for his woes, after failing to cooperate with immigration officials who deported him a second time recently.

While giving a speech to Kenyans living in London on Saturday, Odinga said Miguna refused to listen to advice to surrender his passport for stamping to allow his re-entry into the country.

“I am the one who brought Miguna to NASA, and Miguna was one of those who swore me in as the people’s president and I raised the issue with President Uhuru Kenyatta that Miguna must be part of the package of this handshake, and I talked to Miguna myself and told him to come back,” revealed Odinga.

Odinga recounted events on how the Canadian based lawyer refused to comply with instructions to have his passport stamped to be allowed back into the country.

“I personally went to the airport, then I grabbed Miguna’s hand, came out with him but as we went they closed the door and then they came and told me that they are following instructions… and they have no problem with Miguna; all they wanted him to do was hand over his passport for stamping,” he said.

Odinga said that all his efforts to convince Miguna to surrender his passport were futile hence the eventual deportation.

Miguna did not produce his passport saying that he only had his identity card; making it difficult for police officers to let him.

But the Canadian-schooled lawyer who watched the forum that streamed live faulted Odinga’s statement as ‘scandalous and unbelievable’.

Miguna’s return on March 26 was characterized by highly charged drama that lasted three days following his refusal to produce his Canadian Passport for clearance.

Officials from the Canadian High Commission came the following day with forms that Miguna was supposed sign to regularize his citizenship but he instead tore them up.

Immigration officials argued that the only way Miguna could gain entry into the country was if he produced his travel documents, which he alleges were destroyed when he was initially thrown out of the country.

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