Women at higher risk of chronic kidney diseases

March 8, 2018 4:08 pm
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This emerged as Kenya joined the rest of the world to mark the World’s Kidney Day, coincidentally commemorated with International Women’s Day whose theme was reflecting on women’s health and specifically their kidneys/CFM NEWS

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Mar 8 – Women are at a higher risk of developing chronic kidney diseases compared to men.

This emerged as Kenya joined the rest of the world to mark the World’s Kidney Day, coincidentally commemorated with International Women’s Day whose theme was reflecting on women’s health and specifically their kidneys.

According to Doctor George Moturi a kidney specialist, currently, kidney disease is the 8th cause of death among women with close to 600,000 deaths each year.

“The risk of developing chronic kidney disease is higher in women compared to men, and therefore there is need to increase awareness and education to facilitate women’s access to treatment and better health outcomes,” he said.

Moturi said pregnancy related cases increase the risk of kidney diseases as well as excessive bleeding after birth.

However he said there is need for higher awareness, timely diagnosis and proper follow up of chronic kidney diseases in pregnancy, to allow for planning and therapeutic interventions.

Some kidney diseases, such as lupus nephropathy (or kidney infection) typically affect women.

Lupus nephritis is a kidney disease caused by an autoimmune disease, which is a disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the own cells and organs.

Pyelonephritis is a potentially severe infection that involves one or both kidneys.

Kidney infections (as most urinary tract infections) are more common in women and the risk increases in pregnancy. To ensure good results, as most renal diseases, diagnosis and treatment should be timely.

Some of the symptoms of kidney diseases include, fatigue, high blood pressure, loss of appetite, malaise, or water-electrolyte imbalance.

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