Kenya warns citizens against travel to South Sudan

February 21, 2018 9:23 am
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According to the Foreign Affairs Ministry, the advisory applies specifically to parts of the Greater Upper Nile Region and in particular “Bieh, Latjoor, Akobo, Jonglei, Northern Liech states including sections of Maiwut, Eastern Nile and Boma states and Yei River State/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Feb 21 – Kenyans living or travelling to South Sudan have been advised to move away from and avoid travelling to areas where armed conflicts and inter-ethnic violence have occurred within the last six months.

According to the Foreign Affairs Ministry, the advisory applies specifically to parts of the Greater Upper Nile Region and in particular “Bieh, Latjoor, Akobo, Jonglei, Northern Liech states including sections of Maiwut, Eastern Nile and Boma states and Yei River State.”

“We strongly encourage all those nationals who have not yet registered with the Embassy in Juba to do so immediately, by either visiting the Embassy or through email [email protected],” it said in a statement.

The advisory came a day after two Kenyan pilots detained by rebels in South Sudan in the Akobo region after their plane crash-landed during a humanitarian mission flew back home, after their release Tuesday.

In a statement, the Ministry states that Kenyans in other parts of the country should also “exercise extreme caution as they undertake their daily activities.”

It stated that they should also avoid unnecessary travels in these regions because the security situation is risky and their security cannot be guaranteed.

“In case of emergencies, contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Trade through [email protected] and +25420494992.”

Captain Frank Njoroge and co-pilot Kennedy Shamalla who’ve been held captive since January 7th, arrived at the Wilson Airport Tuesday afternoon aboard a chartered plane, accompanied by a rescue team comprised of government and Red Cross officials.

Foreign Affairs Cabinet Secretary Monica Juma said the two pilots suffered untold misery in the hands of the rebels.

Captain Wachira, who owns the plane, told journalists that Sh10 million was paid to secure the pilots’ release.

The pilots were not allowed to speak to journalists when they arrived at Wilson Airport.

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