Over 150 delegates converge in Arusha for 3rd African Judicial Dialogue

November 8, 2017 1:11 pm
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This year’s theme of the biennial meeting is: ‘’Improving Judicial Efficiency in Africa’’ and is a follow up to the first edition held in November 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania, and second in November 2015, also in Arusha/FILE

, ARUSHA, Tanzania Nov 8 – The Third African Judicial Dialogue, organised by the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (AfCHPR) under the auspices of the African Union (AU), which was earlier planned from 8 to 10 November in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, will be held from November 9 to 11 in Arusha, Tanzania, the seat of the Court.

A statement from the court said that the dialogue will be attended by about 150 delegates from AU Member States, including Chief Justices, Presidents of Supreme and Constitutional Courts from the 55 AU Member States, as well as regional and international judicial bodies and other relevant stakeholders.

This year’s theme of the biennial meeting is: ‘’Improving Judicial Efficiency in Africa’’ and is a follow up to the first edition held in November 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania, and second in November 2015, also in Arusha.

‘’The overall objective of the Dialogue is to explore ways of enhancing judicial efficiency in Africa,’’ said the President of the AfCHPR Justice Sylvain Oré.

He added that the three-day meeting would provide an important forum for Africa’s top judiciary officials to exchange experiences on the on-going continental judicial reforms, trends on human rights jurisprudence, continuing judicial education and management of judicial institutions on the continent.

The African Dialogue is organized in collaboration with the World Bank, the German Cooperation (GiZ) and the European Union (EU).

The Arusha-based court was established under Article 1 of the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Establishment of an African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, to complement the protective mandate of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights with a view to enhancing the protection of human rights on the continent.

Justice Oré has always emphasized that the success of the Court as a human rights protection mechanism requires much wider ratification of the Protocol by Member States, as well as their acceptance of the competence of the Court by making the Declaration under Article 34(6). This “universal” ratification will give the Court the legitimacy it needs to effectively discharge its mandate.

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