57pc of Kenyans to vote along ethnic lines – survey

August 3, 2017 3:17 pm
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“More than half of the people we had a conversation with (57 per cent) confessed that the tribe of a candidate had some influence on how they vote,” reads part of the survey results/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 3 – Kenyans are likely to be influenced by ethnicity while voting, a new survey has revealed.

Respondents captured in the report noted that part of their reason for preferring their kinsmen over others is because “somebody from their tribe will understand their needs.”

This information is according to mSurvey a tech startup that focuses on how feedback is collected through mobile conversations.

They spoke to Kenyans on their election behaviour and gathered the following interesting insights from that interaction.

“More than half of the people we had a conversation with (57 per cent) confessed that the tribe of a candidate had some influence on how they vote,” reads part of the survey results.

“It’s clear that the main reason why Kenyans vote along ethnic lines is the fear of marginalisation, with people citing employment and development as some of the key factors at stake,” the report added.

However, even though a majority of those sampled said that the person they are voting for is from their tribe, a huge chunk of them said that they are scrutinizing their manifestos and party policies.

“Party’s manifesto/policy statement is likely to influence 61 per cent of Kenyans voting decisions,” reads the report adding that “85 per cent were confident that the candidates they were electing would improve their standards of living.”

“Nearly half of Kenyans 44 per cent base their voting decision on who is capable of formulating good policies while another 27 per cent base their decision on the candidate’s reputation and track record,” reckoned the survey.

On voter education, respondents revealed that they got more information from government institutions while TV was cited as the most popular medium followed closely by radio and the internet/social media.

“Fifty per cent of Kenyans have received some form of voter education within the past six months. Of the people who received this education 54 percent got this information from governmental institutions,” revealed the report.

“TV was the most popular medium for voter education, followed closely by radio and the Internet/social media,” the survey added.

The survey which sampled 593 respondents from all eight regions of Kenya found out that “92 per cent know all the six elective positions.”

However, the survey also discovered the signs that the roles of these positions are unclear. “52 per cent believe that the President’s role will have the most impact on their lives, compared to 1pc who think the same of a Senator.”

Despite the fact that Kenyans have different political stands, it is evident that most of them are looking forward to a peaceful election season as shared by 59 per cent of the respondents surveyed.

mSurvey wanted to find out if voter education had any impact on Kenyan attitudes towards electing their leaders.

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