KWS receives donation in medicine for lions, as part of conservation efforts

March 16, 2017 7:53 pm
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The medicine which comes in handy for the cash strapped institution is set to be distributed in the all parks and conversations in the country while the rest will be retained at the forensic lab/MUTHONI WAWERU

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Mar 16 – The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) on Thursday received medicine and equipment worth half a million shillings that will go towards lion conservation in the country.

The medicine which comes in handy for the cash strapped institution is set to be distributed in the all parks and conversations in the country while the rest will be retained at the forensic lab.

Head of veterinary services Francis Gakuya says the supply will help boost the population of lions which other than human wildlife conflict, has also been affected by diseases.

“Part of the medication will be used within the Nairobi clinic then the rest will be distributed to the mobile veterinary units in the country,” said Gakuya.

“Lions have quite a number of diseases that affect them with the leading one being rabies and various other viral diseases.”

KWS acting Deputy Director Strategy and Change Edwin Wanyonyi stated that the donation will go a long way in addressing some of the diseases affecting lions and other canine species.

“The donation from the West Indian Ocean Cable Company (WIOCC) will help support our conservation efforts,” stated Wanyonyi.

“The medicine donated today is not easily available in our local market, and the procurement process is a lengthy one.”

He noted that the stocks donated are sufficient meaning that the response team can counter the challenges they meet and address it on time.

Wanyonyi also called on the private sector to join in the conservation efforts especially those who use the wild animals as their company brands.

“Conservation is expensive, and the mandate for KWS is very wide therefore we appreciate having partners,” he said, “We would like to invite other partners to support.”

Wanyonyi says they are working on boosting the lion population which currently stands at 2,000.

“We have a desire to grow this number; we also have issues to do with the rhino population and are working on new strategies to grow the current population,” said Wanyonyi.

“And therefore this support from partners will enable us address the issues particularly those using the lion or the elephants as their emblem should come in and join in the conservation efforts.”

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