Arusha to host 2nd African judicial dialogue

October 27, 2015 5:37 am
Shares

,

The talks will be attended by about 200 delegates from AU member states, including Chief Justices, Presidents of Supreme Courts and Constitutional Courts and academia/FILE
The talks will be attended by about 200 delegates from AU member states, including Chief Justices, Presidents of Supreme Courts and Constitutional Courts and academia/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya, Oct 27 – The African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the African Union are set to hold a joint Continental Judicial Dialogue early next month in Arusha over ways of enhancing judicial administration and ensuring quality justice for Africans across the continent

The talks will be attended by about 200 delegates from AU member states, including Chief Justices, Presidents of Supreme Courts and Constitutional Courts and academia.

The theme of the three-day biennial dialogue is “Connecting National and International Justice” and is a follow up to the first edition held in November 2013 still in Arusha.

“The Continental Judicial Dialogue offers an opportune occasion for productive knowledge-sharing with the goal of establishing and enhancing linkages between the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, on the one hand, and the regional and the national courts, on the other hand,” said the President of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, Justice Augustino Ramadhani.

The participants will discuss, among others, the ongoing continental judicial reforms, trends on human rights jurisprudence, continuing judicial education and management of judicial institutions.

During the meeting, participants will discuss quality management systems of courts and also share of experiences from other continents.

The first dialogue discussed the African human rights system in general and the relationship between the African Court and the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights in particular.

The contentious and advisory jurisdictions of these two institutions were discussed as well as the human rights jurisprudence of the regional courts.

It also discussed the various approaches to domestication of international human rights instruments and their application by national courts as well as the enforcement of the decisions of continental and regional courts by national institutions.

One of the conclusions of the first conference was that a proposal should be tabled to the African Union policy organs that the dialogue be institutionalised within the AU and that it be held on a biennial basis.

Shares

Latest Articles

Most Viewed