New ideas, courage needed to meet SDGs – Uhuru

September 26, 2015 6:30 am
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President Kenyatta told the assembly, in New York, that the goals are ambitious and need an equally robust development mechanism. Photo/PSCU.
President Kenyatta told the assembly, in New York, that the goals are ambitious and need an equally robust development mechanism. Photo/PSCU.
NEW YORK, United States, Sep 26 – New ideas and courage will be critical in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted Friday at the United Nations General Assembly, according to President Uhuru Kenyatta.

President Kenyatta told the assembly, in New York, that the goals are ambitious and need an equally robust development mechanism.

“Without resources, the goals may never be realised; resources from development partners are critical,” he said Friday afternoon, but emphasised that trade was a means of ending poverty, as aid was.

“We should address issues that have in the past impeded developing countries from channeling adequate resources to the needs of the poor. I believe that addressing debt sustainability and trade will go a long way in addressing these needs.”

Kenya was a co-facilitator in drafting the 17 post 2015 development goals, and is now set to host the second high level meeting on the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation in November 2016.

“Many of the goals in the post-2015 development agenda resonate with Kenya’s development aspirations as articulate in our blueprint Vision 2030. We are convinced that under this agenda, a world free of poverty and hunger is achievable within the next 15 years.”

President Kenyatta pointed out that the world must acknowledge progress in achieving the preceding Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) had been uneven across the globe, and across the goals.

“There are huge disparities between and within countries. Within countries, rural poverty remains unacceptably high while urban poverty is extensive, growing and unreported by traditional indicators.”

He however, acknowledged that the primary responsibility for development lies with individual nations.

“Effective mobilization of resources in the context of global partnership will be critical,” he concluded.

Earlier in the day, Pope Francis welcomed the new global agenda as an “important sign of hope” in his speech to the UN General Assembly and urged leaders to deliver on their promise to transform the world by 2030.

“Solemn commitments are not enough, even though they are a necessary step toward solutions,” the pope said as he urged leaders to take “concrete steps and immediate measures” to protect the environment and end exclusion.

Billed as the most ambitious anti-poverty plan ever, the 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets were adopted at the start of the summit that capped three years of tough-going negotiations.

They will replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that expire this year and apply to both developing and developed countries.

The new UN agenda aims to end poverty, ensure healthy lives, promote education and combat climate change, at a cost of between $3.5 trillion and $5tr per year until 2030.

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