Former anti-terror chief rejects Garissa posting, opts to quit

June 25, 2015 3:38 pm
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Garissa is a hot spot of Al Shabaab attacks. All top officers were moved after the April university college attack. Photo/ FILE
Garissa is a hot spot of Al Shabaab attacks. All top officers were moved after the April university college attack. Photo/ FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Jun 25 – Former Anti Terrorism Police Unit boss Boniface Mwaniki has declined his new posting to Garissa County as the CID chief and instead opted to resign.

Mwaniki is understood to have written to CID boss Ndegwa Muhoro saying the posting will expose his life to danger having served as the country’s anti-terrorism unit chief.

Mwaniki was re-deployed to Garissa in changes affecting more than 50 other senior officers, mainly drawn from the CID.

Those close to him say he was also uncomfortable with the new posting because it is more of a demotion since has been holding a national office.

The changes were announced on June 17 by the National Police Service Commission in a bid to restore security.

Areas that were affected by the changes included Garissa, Wajir and Mandera in northern Kenya after increased threats from Al Shabaab militants.

On April 2, an attack at Garissa University College claimed 148 lives.

Security apparatus remain on high alert following intelligence report indicating those Al-Shabaab militias were targeting the country during the Holy month of Ramadhan.

Among the targeted areas according to Inspector General of Police Joseph Boinnet include various government and learning institutions, markets, shopping malls, religious institutions and journalists who report negatively about them.

Police presence, he said, has especially been enhanced in the coastal region, Nairobi and the North Eastern parts of the country as they remain prone.

“Some of their wicked plans include targeting key Government installations, security personnel, journalists who report negatively about them and other Kenyans in order to sow discord amongst the citizens,” he pointed out.

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