Narok leaders fail to honour police summons

January 27, 2015 3:06 pm
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Senator Stephen ole Ntutu and three MPs who were summoned to explain why they ignored a government directive to stop demonstrations aimed at ousting Governor Samuel Tunai. Photo/ FILE
Senator Stephen ole Ntutu and three MPs who were summoned to explain why they ignored a government directive to stop demonstrations aimed at ousting Governor Samuel Tunai. Photo/ FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Jan 27 – Four leaders accused of organising a violent protest in Narok where two people were killed on Monday have failed to honour CID summons to record statements over the matter.

They include area Senator Stephen ole Ntutu and three MPs who were summoned to explain why they ignored a government directive to stop demonstrations aimed at ousting Governor Samuel Tunai.

CID Director Ndegwa Muhoro had on Tuesday morning told Capital FM News that the leaders were required to appear before detectives but they failed to do so.

Narok West Member of Parliament Patrick ole Ntutu however told Capital FM News that they would record the statements on Wednesday at CID headquarters.

“We will go there at 9am; we cannot run away from justice,” he said.

Interior Cabinet Secretary Joseph Nkaissery who had warned against the protests at the weekend has reiterated that the leaders must obey the summons.

Two people were killed and four others seriously wounded during the protest that turned chaotic when thousands of residents staged the demonstrations to Tunai’s office.

READ: 2 dead, OCPD hurt as anti-Tunai protest turns violent

The leaders have accused Tunai of misappropriating public funds among other concerns.

Nkaissery at the weekend warned against any form of protests in the county, saying any leadership issues should be resolved through dialogue.

He appealed to the area leaders to use dialogue instead of engaging in tactics that could escalate to violence.

“The government also wishes to point out that when allegations of corruption in Narok County emerged, officers from the office of the Auditor-General as well as the office of Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) were swiftly dispatched to the county to investigate,” he said.

“Leaders from the area are advised to resolve their issues through dialogue instead of employing tactics that could escalate into violence.”

Nkaissery said that the corruption claims were already being investigated, saying the residents should wait for the outcome.

“The government has been following closely developments in Narok County and is deeply concerned over escalating levels of tension, which could result into violent confrontations if not contained,” he said.

“In this regard, all leaders in the county should exercise patience awaiting the completion of investigations of alleged corruption.”

On Monday, the protesters estimated at thousands had camped at the county government headquarters, demanding to hand a petition to the governor, but turned chaotic, when a group attempted to storm in his office.

Among those wounded is area police chief, Paul Leting and two of his juniors, police said of the protests, which brought Narok town to a stand still for several hours.

Police fired live bullets and lobbed teargas to disperse the crowd, which quickly re-grouped and took positions outside the county offices.

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