200,000 clusters formed in Nyumba Kumi drive

January 23, 2015 2:11 pm
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Kaguthi told Capital FM News that the four counties would operate with committees instead of clusters owing to the state of insecurity in the areas/JOSEPH MURAYA
Kaguthi told Capital FM News that the four counties would operate with committees instead of clusters owing to the state of insecurity in the areas/JOSEPH MURAYA
NAIROBI, Kenya, Jan 23 – Nyumba Kumi Initiative chairman Joseph Kaguthi says they have formed over 200,000 security clusters to improve information gathering that may help curb insecurity in various part of the country.

He says the clusters are widely distributed in 43 counties while security committees will be formed in Mandera, Wajir, Garissa and Tana River counties.

Kaguthi told Capital FM News that the four counties would operate with committees instead of clusters owing to the state of insecurity in the areas.

He said the initiative was so far successful saying gradually; Kenyans are learning to take security as their own responsibility.

“We have a challenge particularly in some parts of Nairobi where some owners are yet to allow their tenants to form some grouping…it is wrong and risky,” he lamented.

“The threat is real… we must all stay vigilant and aware of our environment.”

Kaguthi has however cautioned against politicizing matters of security, in reference to the outcry that followed enactment of tougher security laws. The President being the custodian of the Constitution, Kaguthi said, should be empowered in dealing with cases of insecurity in the country.

“We need a president who is a commander-in-chief of the armed forces… having an Inspector General who has total independence is wrong,” he pointed out.

“When there is a problem, the people blame it on the President. He should then have power to deliver and more so protecting the nation.”

Under the new law, the President has now been accorded powers to appoint an Inspector General of Police who will then be approved by the National Assembly.

President Uhuru Kenyatta late last year, nominated Joseph Kipchirchir Boinett to replace retired Inspector General of Police David Kimaiyo.

READ: Uhuru picks intelligence officer as police boss

And while supporting the new laws, Kaguthi said it was the necessary tool to empower both the president and security personnel in dealing with the ever imminent threat of terror.

The law has however stumbled after the Coalition for Reforms and Democracy filed an objection at the High Court which suspended eight clauses pending hearing of the case.

READ: Appeals court declines to reinstate security laws clauses

A three judge bench led by Justice Daniel Musinga found that the suspension of the eight clauses created no vacuum in law and would not hamper the efforts of security agents to secure the Kenyan citizenry.

“Apart from the eight sections whose operationalisation has been temporarily suspended, all other laws of Kenya are still in full operation. We entertain no doubt that as we await either the hearing of the appeal before this court or the finalization of the petitions before the high court, the country’s security agents and law enforcement organs can still make full use of the existing laws to keep the country and its people safe,” they found.

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