EACC begins auditing Parliament’s financial systems

December 4, 2014 3:57 pm
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EACC chairman Mumo Matemu said the exercise is aimed at sealing loopholes that could lead to corruption in the undertakings of Parliament/CFM
EACC chairman Mumo Matemu said the exercise is aimed at sealing loopholes that could lead to corruption in the undertakings of Parliament/CFM
NAIROBI, Kenya, Dec 4 – The Ethic and Anti-corruption Commission (EACC) on Thursday started a review into the financial management of the Parliamentary Service Commission (PSC).

EACC chairman Mumo Matemu said the exercise is aimed at sealing loopholes that could lead to corruption in the undertakings of Parliament.

National Assembly Speaker Justin Muturi wrote to the anti-corruption watchdog in September to request for help in designing an efficient finance management system for Parliament to stop cash misappropriations and pilferage by MPs.

“An efficient financial management system in the Legislature will not only provide hope to the citizens but will also contribute in raising public confidence in government systems as a whole,” Matemu said during the launch.

Muturi, who chairs the PSC said Parliament should be above reproach as it is the institution that oversights all institutions.

“This is not an audit neither is it an investigation,” Muturi added. “As the supreme body when it comes to ensuring accountability of public funds, Parliament cannot be the one pointing at the speck in others eyes while there is a log – if they find one – in our eyes.”

Muturi says they are determined to curb corruption in Parliament.

Various oversight institutions have concerns on financial impropriety relating to various claims and allowances which have also been replicated at the County Assembly level.

The initiative is aimed at re-looking, strengthening and reviewing the PSC financial systems for effective allocation and usage of parliamentary funds to ensure value for money and transparency.

The Auditor-General is each financial year required to submit to Parliament an audit report highlighting the expenditure of all government departments, agencies, constitutional and independent commissions.

Parliament’s Public Accounts Committee (PAC) will then scrutinise the report as well as seek explanation from defaulting agencies before reporting back to the House with recommendations which are aimed at of ensuring prudent use of public funds.

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