Swedish support boosts Nyumba Kumi

September 17, 2014 3:31 pm
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Inspector General of Police David Kimaiyo who witnessed the handing over of two motorcycles and a truck in a ceremony held at the Kikuyu Police Station, said community policing is set to reduce the rates of crime across the country/MIKE KARIUKI
Inspector General of Police David Kimaiyo who witnessed the handing over of two motorcycles and a truck in a ceremony held at the Kikuyu Police Station, said community policing is set to reduce the rates of crime across the country/MIKE KARIUKI
NAIROBI, Kenya, Sept 17 – Community policing under the Nyumba Kumi initiative has received a boost under projects between the National Police Service and the Swedish Government.

Among the initiatives is construction of a gender and child protection unit at the Kikuyu Police Station and training of 42 trainers by Sweden’s National Police Board.

They have also trained 10 police officers on the initiative along with the Chairman of the Kikuyu Community Policing Committee at the Institute of Police Education-Linneaus University in Sweden.

Other than in Kikuyu, similar projects have been rolled out to four other areas namely Kimilili Police Station in Bungoma County, Kajiado Police Station in Kajiado County and Riontonyi Police Station in Kisii County. Sotik Police Station in Bomet has also benefited from the project.

Inspector General of Police David Kimaiyo who witnessed the handing over of two motorcycles and a truck in a ceremony held at the Kikuyu Police Station, said community policing is set to reduce the rates of crime across the country.

“The National Police Service is looking forward with a lot of expectations to arise to its potential and capacity to adjust the way we have implemented community policing in the past,” he stated.

“For that to be realised, we are expected to play our role in maintaining law and order.”

The truck is the first of its kind and will serve all areas across the country as a mobile office.

It is fitted with a public address system to be used during sensitisation campaigns on the Nyumba Kumi initiative.

Kimaiyo challenged members of public to endorse the initiative by sharing crucial information with the police that may help tackle insecurity.

“Timely reporting can make all the difference between safety and a situation of insecurity, and therefore we should embrace community policing for a safer society,” he affirmed.

He also said that the National Police Service was set to introduce the Swedish Intelligence module to enhance specialised skills and service delivery.

This will also include modules for community policing and forensics for the basic recruit and curriculum.

Police hope to create more understanding between them and the public, “about their role in crime prevention.”

The Inspector General pointed out the massive allocation of funds to the police, as proof by the Government of its support to improve the police service.

In the 2014-15 financial year, Sh62.2 billion was set aside for policing services, Sh71.3 billion for the Kenya Defence Forces and Sh17.4 billion for the National Security Intelligence.

To enhance police mobility, the government will spend Sh6.7 billion to lease 2,700 motor vehicles and aircraft.

To increase police numbers, the government will use Sh2.9 billion for police recruitment and training.

In a bid to enhance police operations, the government will use Sh3.3 billion and Sh3.5 billion for upgrade of police equipment and modernisation and Sh1.3 billion to cater for police housing.

Swedish Ambassador to Kenya Johan Borgstam challenged the government to channel more resources to community policing so as to prevent crime through early detection.

He said that this will foster an active partnership between police and the public, “through which crime and community safety issues can jointly be discussed and solutions determined and implemented.”

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