School wants dreadlocks case dismissed

September 15, 2014 12:55 pm
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The school which has been sued by a parent for refusing to admit her child for having deadlocks, insists that it has rules and regulations on grooming/FILE
The school which has been sued by a parent for refusing to admit her child for having deadlocks, insists that it has rules and regulations on grooming/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya, Sep 15 – The Rusinga School says it has a grooming policy which all parents are required to subscribe to when their children are admitted.

The school which has been sued by a parent for refusing to admit her child for having deadlocks, insists that it has rules and regulations on grooming.

The Principal of Rusinga Preparatory School Nelly Omino says different rules apply for female and male students with respect to hairstyles which does not amount to discrimination. In response to the parent’s suit, Omino opposes the petition on grounds that it does not disclose any actual and or apprehended violation of any fundamental freedom and asks the court to dismiss it.

She states “the promulgation of different rules for male and female students by a private school with respect to hairstyles and length does not amount to discrimination on account of gender as alleged by the petitioner.”

The rules and regulations according to the principal are stipulated in accordance with the school’s philosophy and students have the responsibility to adhere to them with parents expected to support them.

Rusinga School Ltd, Omino explains, was founded in 1975 by expatriates and Christians of over 40 nationalities are represented. According to the principal, there are four levels at the school and at the end of each when learners are transitioning from one key stage to another, assessments are done to check their level of attainment in various skills.

She insists the school is consistent with its values and beliefs and has promulgated a grooming policy, which all parents subscribe to when their child is admitted.

Omino explains that other British curriculum schools have similar uniform and grooming rules and regulations depending on the judgment of the administrator to help the children gain the greatest possible benefit from their school experience.

The aggrieved parent has accused the school of refusing to admit her son yet he was allowed to have dreadlocks for the four years that he was attending kindergarten classes. However, the school says that it does not vigorously enforce the rules and regulations for kindergarten students on grounds that children at this level are referred to as pre-scholars.

The school adds that pre-scholars are handled with special sensitivity and understanding and having too many rules and regulations might make a child withdraw.

The case will be heard from Tuesday.

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