Kenya feels abandoned in terror war – Uhuru

August 6, 2014 7:04 am
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President Kenyatta explained to Quest that following the 9/11 attacks, the international community rallied around the US, but in Kenya's case, the West immediately issued travel advisories/CFM
President Kenyatta explained to Quest that following the 9/11 attacks, the international community rallied around the US, but in Kenya’s case, the West immediately issued travel advisories/CFM
NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 6 – In an interview with CNN’s Richard Quest on the sidelines of the US-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington DC, President Uhuru Kenyatta said Kenya felt abandoned by the international community in its fight against terrorism .

President Kenyatta explained to Quest that following the 9/11 attacks, the international community rallied around the US, but in Kenya’s case, the West immediately issued travel advisories.

“We do feel the world isn’t doing enough to support us in confronting the challenges we have.”

The travel advisories, he said, served to encourage those behind the terror attacks on Kenya, the Al Shabaab.

“Richard Branson, for example, has gone out there and said no, let’s not issue these travel advisories, we should actually face up to the enemy, invest more, be more in Kenya.”

He said Kenya’s forces in Somalia would benefit from the support of the international community as would the government of Somalia in order to more expediently root out the Al Shabaab.

“The operations that are ongoing can be expanded to cover a greater part of Somalia so that we can reduce the area of operation of people like the Al Shabaab.”

Nevertheless, he said, the region was doing everything within its, “limited resources,” to combat the threat posed by the Al Shabaab.

“On our part what we are doing is increasing tremendously our investment in the security sector because we recognise that security is key to ensuring long term investment.”

President Kenyatta’s admission that his government does not feel adequately supported by the international community in the fight against terror follows assurances from the British and US envoys that Kenya was not alone in the war against terror.

READ We haven’t abandoned Kenya in terror war – UK

The envoys in subsequent events over the last two months also defended the travel advisories issued against Kenya, accusing the Kenyan government of blowing them out of proportion.

“We have three more levels in our travel advice before we get to evacuation but it was not against the whole country and I was not advising 25,000 people to leave,” British High Commissioner to Kenya Christian Turner said in defence in June.

But even as the US and Britain expressed solidarity with Kenya in the fight against terror, the US Embassy in Kenya has cut back on its human resource and Britain is set to move its visa processing section from Nairobi to Pretoria beginning 2015.

Support in the area of security is one of the things President Kenyatta’s government had sought to secure during the US-Africa Leaders Summit.

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