Survey rates Jubilee poorly on security, graft war

June 16, 2014 12:30 pm
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TI Kenya Executive Director Samuel Kimeu said another 53 percent of the respondents believe that insecurity is the most pressing problem the national government has to deal with/FILE
TI Kenya Executive Director Samuel Kimeu said another 53 percent of the respondents believe that insecurity is the most pressing problem the national government has to deal with/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya, Jun 16 – As 48 people were reported killed in a gun attack in Lamu, a study carried out by Transparency International Kenya (TI Kenya) showed that 61 percent of Kenyans believe the national government has dealt poorly with insecurity.

TI Kenya Executive Director Samuel Kimeu said another 53 percent of the respondents believe that insecurity is the most pressing problem the national government has to deal with.

“Twenty-eight percent rated the national government average on national security and 11 percent rated the government good on national security,” Kimeu added.

READ 48 dead so far in Mpeketoni terror attack

Corruption came in second as the area in which the national government had performed most poorly in, and which Kimeu blamed on lack of commitment to enforce anti-corruption legislation.

“I think that there are some very basic things we are struggling with that in my view we shouldn’t be struggling with. We have a law on leadership and integrity and we need to be serious as institutions to make sure people who contravene this don’t hold public office.

“As we speak, there are about three Members of Parliament who are facing economic crime charges yet to the best of my knowledge are still discharging their oversight roles. One must ask themselves what the quality of that oversight is. Yet the Economic Crimes Act provides that they stand suspended on half pay until they are cleared,” he gave as an example.

The study, which was carried out between April 9 and May 7, was done as the ghosts of the corrupt Anglo-Leasing deals returned to haunt Kenyans and could explain why the national government was cited poorly on corruption.

Still on corruption, Kimeu said the report showed that the Judiciary had dropped from the most trusted institution in this respect to the bottom three.

“The last time we asked this question, the Judiciary was the most trusted. Now, only nine percent of Kenyans maintain that belief. A drop I think can partly be attributed to the underhand dealings exposed by the former Chief Registrar, the Judicial Service Commission and the Auditor General,” Kimeu told Capital FM News.

Insecurity and corruption are also both problems the Coalition for Reforms and Democracy has for the last two weeks criticised the national government for failing to effectively tackle as they call for national dialogue on July 7.

READ: Raila wants Sh1.4bn Anglo Leasing cash refunded.

The TI Kenya findings are based on face-to- face interviews conducted with 1,993 respondents in 16 of the 47 counties.

“These counties were purposively selected with the following considerations: former provincial headquarters, counties where TI-Kenya has a physical presence and counties included for regional balance,” Kimeu explained.

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