Lenku defends Safaricom Sh15bn security tender

June 4, 2014 1:27 pm
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Lenku says the law is clear on what the government should do whenever single-sourcing contracts as provided in public procurement regulations/FILE
Lenku says the law is clear on what the government should do whenever single-sourcing contracts as provided in public procurement regulations/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya, Jun 4 – Interior Cabinet Secretary Joseph ole Lenku insists that the contract awarded to Safaricom for installation of security surveillance was done procedurally.

Lenku says the law is clear on what the government should do whenever single-sourcing contracts as provided in public procurement regulations.

A section of Members of Parliament have demanded an explanation from the government on how the multi-billion shilling tender was awarded.

“There are instances where a tender is done in a public framework; there is even a provision for single sourcing and it is not the first the Government has used single sourcing,” he stated.

“The process of procuring was above board and we will make any information available to those interested because the Government has nothing to hide.”

Police will be able to relay videos and pictures while at a crime scene once the Sh15 billion communications, command and control system is rolled out by December.

Once in place, police will be issued with new walkie-talkies fitted with other advanced security features.

Safaricom Chief Executive Officer Bob Collymore has since explained that the service will strictly be accessed by the National Police Service, while dispelling fears of hacking.

READ High tech security surveillance ready by December

The new system cannot be infiltrated; its better manned and will enhance real-time security once rolled out, according Lenku.

“A key component of modernisation programme is the issue of communication surveillance, command and control centre in the issues of policing,” he stated.

“This is a culmination of a long process with an ultimate goal of addressing security. We cannot wait to see this project fully implemented.”

The new system will be controlled from the Jogoo House command centre where all police officers can be tracked while undertaking their duties.

A total of 7,600 police officers can be served at a go but it will be scaled to 50,000 officers later on.

It will first be implemented in Nairobi and Mombasa with over 1,000 cameras set to be fitted in strategic positions.

The system uses three high definition cameras; infra-red camera, box camera and dome cameras.

The dome camera can cover a 360 degree area while the infra-red camera will have ability to capture images in low light areas.

Police will easily track lost vehicles or one which has been used to commit crime due to number plate recognition.

Police are just required to feed the system with the car details and every time it passes an area fitted with the cameras, an alert will go to the command system.

Lenku was speaking when he unveiled a three-year strategic plan that will guide its operations in enhancing security in the country, including the implementation of the digital surveillance system.

He said the three year strategic plan will also ensure effective use of public resources to avoid misuse.

Lenku says they will strictly adhere to its implementation to improve the living conditions of police officers countrywide.

“The security sector is very broad and therefore together with our stakeholders we are going through the plan before we fully roll out in the next financial year,” he stated.

During the three years, the ministry is obligated to ensure the installation of CCTV cameras in major urban towns and establishment of command control centre and complete police reforms including the construction of housing facilities for National Police Service.

It is also expected to ensure, “construction of 4,000 staff houses every year for prison officers.”

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