12 cancer screening centres to be set up across the country

April 27, 2014 11:13 am
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The society’s president Antony Mamati says the facilities dubbed ‘Inua Jamii Centres’ will be set up at a cost Sh588 million and will be spread across the 47 counties/FILE
The society’s president Antony Mamati says the facilities dubbed ‘Inua Jamii Centres’ will be set up at a cost Sh588 million and will be spread across the 47 counties/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 27 – The Society of Radiography in Kenya (SORK) has announced plans to open 12 clinical centres and 35 satellite centres to offer integrated radiography services at lower costs.

The society’s president Antony Mamati says the facilities dubbed ‘Inua Jamii Centres’ will be set up at a cost Sh588 million and will be spread across the 47 counties.

The main source of financing the project will be through bank loans and contribution by the over 400 members.

The Inua Jamii Centres will offer diagnostic radiography units as the basic services and this will entail all radiography and imaging services.

Speaking during the launch of the project on Saturday Mamati said they target to reach close to 20 million Kenyans in the next five year who he says cannot be able to access basic screening services.

“In the past we have seen people travel all the way to Nairobi or other main towns in this country to get even the basic ultrasound services like cancer screening and treatment,” he lamented.

The first centre will be launched in Nairobi in October this year with main focus being on cancer screening. Members of staff at the centres will be the radiographers who are members of SORK.

“Most of the cancer cases could be treated if Kenyans could easily access these screening services. This is what we want to make it easy because the disease is a menace now,” he said.

According to the Kenya Cancer Association, about 70 Kenyans are dying every day due to cancer case, largely contributed to late diagnosis.

“This is like three to four matatus crashing every day. Can you imagine if it was the normal accidents, we would be talking about it more. But I still believe there is something we can do,” the association’s vice chair David Makumi said.

In 2012, 38,544 cancer cases were diagnosed while 26,941 Kenyans died.

“Our biggest problem is that most patients are diagnosed when the cancer has gone too far. But if we come up with these centres we will help a majority access screening and get other services,” Makumi said.

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