Swazuri overstepping his mandate, says Ngilu

March 17, 2014 4:13 pm
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“The National Lands Commission is supposed mainly to deal with public land and not private land; they need to stick to what the Constitution has said they need to do”/VICTORIA KIOKO
“The National Lands Commission is supposed mainly to deal with public land and not private land; they need to stick to what the Constitution has said they need to do”/VICTORIA KIOKO
NAIROBI, Kenya, Mar 17 – Lands Cabinet Secretary Charity Ngilu is accusing the National Lands Commission of interfering with her work following wrangles over administration of land matters and issuance of title deeds.

Speaking at a hand over of title deeds in Nairobi’s Kayole estate, Ngilu said that the Mohammed Swazuri-led commission’s main function is to deal with registration of public land and renewal of land leases but nothing to do with titles.

“The Constitution clearly spells out the functions of the ministry and the function of the National Lands Commission and therefore each one of us must do what the Constitution expects them to do,” she said.

“The National Lands Commission is supposed mainly to deal with public land and not private land; they need to stick to what the Constitution has said they need to do.”

The Cabinet Secretary further says her ministry is committed to serving Kenyans, vowing that her work will not be hindered by the perceived differences with Swazuri.

She has re-affirmed President Uhuru Kenyatta’s assurance of the Jubilee government’s commitment to issue one million title deeds to genuine land owners by the end of this year.

“There is no delay whatsoever, all I’m saying is that we are now going to do bulk titling and the titling is still going on in all the registries,” She assured.

“We did transfer a few officers and that is in order, we were able to do so with the support of the Public Service Commission and therefore we are moving on, we are serving ‘wananchi’.”

Ngilu further defended the use of typewriters which her ministry is seeking, saying they are required in remote areas which are yet to be digitised.

Her remarks follow an outcry from a section of leaders and the public who argued that the typewriters and duplicators the ministry is seeking are obsolete in this digital era.

“I’m sure you all know that typewriters are still being used in many places in this country because we are all digitised do not look surprised, we are all Nairobians! We are all digitised!”

“There are many places in this country where typewriters are still being used. In fact, even in some provincial offices,” she said.

“But we are getting rid of these soon; we are going to be digitised.”

She has assured Kenyans that the government, including her ministry is committed to embracing new technology once the necessary infrastructure is rolled out in all areas.

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