Marsabit leaders agree on peace plan

February 15, 2014 3:28 pm
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Former National Assembly Speaker Francis ole Kaparo and Garissa County Senator Yusuf Haji said they will be presenting their report to President Uhuru Kenyatta next week detailing the aspects of the agreement which will see equal resources distribution and reconstruction and resettlement of the displaced/MIKE KARIUKI
Former National Assembly Speaker Francis ole Kaparo and Garissa County Senator Yusuf Haji said they will be presenting their report to President Uhuru Kenyatta next week detailing the aspects of the agreement which will see equal resources distribution and reconstruction and resettlement of the displaced/MIKE KARIUKI
NAIROBI, Kenya, Feb 15 – Marsabit leaders have agreed on the formation of an oversight team that will implement measures for a long lasting peace in the area.

Former National Assembly Speaker Francis ole Kaparo and Garissa County Senator Yusuf Haji said they will be presenting their report to President Uhuru Kenyatta next week detailing the aspects of the agreement which will see equal resources distribution and reconstruction and resettlement of the displaced.

“The national government should enhance security and declare insecurity In Marsabit a national disaster, negotiations and consultations on resource allocations have commenced and shall be embraced by all leaders with a view to find means and ways of equitable distribution of resources whether financial or human,” read part of Boma Hotel Declaration.

“Reconstruction and resettlement shall take precedence in all the affected areas and the county government shall closely work with other organisations to facilitate this progress.”

President Uhuru Kenyatta had earlier this month given the Marsabit leaders a one week ultimatum on peace warning that if the negotiations fail, all measures will be taken to ensure peace returns to Marsabit, including presenting a proposal to Parliament on how that should be done.

Kaparo and Haji said in their efforts to mediate between the warring groups in Marsabit County they travelled to the region and were shocked by the destruction and humanitarian crisis the fighting had left behind.

“We are asking people from Moyale and Marsabit if they must have differences, then it must not go past a verbal exchange. Because we have seen war brings devastation such as the one we saw. We saw house and households which were torn apart and this will take a long time to undo and unite the societies.”

“This kind of fighting brings poverty and breakdown of the society, I can say it was miserable state of affairs,” said the former Speaker.

He said the negotiations aimed at ending the conflict was successful because all the warring groups had respected a ceasefire which had been imposed on February 6.

A Sh5 million fine was imposed on the community that was found to have contravened the ceasefire. The fines will be used as compensation to the community that has been wronged in accordance with the conflict resolutions traditions.

“I would say that the locals were happy to see that the government had sent us (to mediate on the clashes), this gave them an avenue to speak from hearts, which is one of the ways to address the problems they have been going through,” said the Garissa Senator.

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