Kimaiyo orders survey on graft in his ranks

February 25, 2014 5:06 pm
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Kimaiyo said on Tuesday that two have a month to achieve four objectives: "To establish to what extent the vice exists, its prevalence, causes and to make recommendations on how it can be addressed."/FILE
Kimaiyo said on Tuesday that two have a month to achieve four objectives: “To establish to what extent the vice exists, its prevalence, causes and to make recommendations on how it can be addressed.”/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya, Feb 25 – Inspector General of Police David Kimaiyo has directed his deputy Grace Kaindi of the regular police and the Director of Criminal Investigations Ndegwa Muhoro to conduct a survey and compile a report on corruption in the National Police Service (NPS).

Kimaiyo said on Tuesday that two have a month to achieve four objectives: “To establish to what extent the vice exists, its prevalence, causes and to make recommendations on how it can be addressed.”

The police boss said the strategy deployed so far didn’t appear to be working and made it known that he would not draw the line at sackings, however many officers it took to rid the service of the vice.

“Unfortunately I have time and again cautioned my officers against this vice and it would appear that there are those who are bent on maintaining their wayward negative behaviour. To these officers, as painful as it may be, I am saying that they have outlived their usefulness,” he stated.

Kimaiyo’s latest condemnation of corruption was sparked by an NTV Uganda special that showed Kenyan police on the highway from Malaba to Mombasa take bribes of between Sh50 and Sh100 amounting to about Sh5,000 in total, from truck drivers at the expense of security.

“In Kenya, police corruption is blatant, brazen, strewn with arrogance and impunity. Uganda’s police is not innocent but is more discreet and careful,” the narrator of the news segment observed.

The Kenya Police Service often tops corruption indices and the vetting exercise conducted by the National Police Service Commission showed just how high up the vice goes.

And as part of its effort to reform, Kimaiyo on Tuesday also invited the public to weigh in on the NPS draft Standing Orders published on their website and launched on February 19.

“These orders contain both administrative and operational tools which are aimed at providing guidelines to all the officers in the performance of their duties,” he explained.

The public has until March 18 to make their views known to their consultant via email [email protected] or [email protected]

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