Use GPS to end cattle rustling, advises Kaguthi

November 25, 2013 12:36 pm
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Speaking during a forum in Nairobi on Monday, Kaguthi pointed out that authorities will be able to track any stolen animals, the main cause of conflict between communities in Samburu, Turkana and Pokot/FELIX MAGARA
Speaking during a forum in Nairobi on Monday, Kaguthi pointed out that authorities will be able to track any stolen animals, the main cause of conflict between communities in Samburu, Turkana and Pokot/FELIX MAGARA
NAIROBI, Kenya, Nov 25 – The Chairman of the National task force on community policing Joseph Kaguthi says that a GPS system of tracking animals should be introduced in Turkana to reduce cases of cattle rustling.

Speaking during a forum in Nairobi on Monday, Kaguthi pointed out that authorities will be able to track any stolen animals, the main cause of conflict between communities in Samburu, Turkana and Pokot.

Kaguthi indicated that these communities clash, mostly over cattle rustling and territory.

“Just look at the Governor of Samburu. He will be the first one to say that he wants to introduce some funding so long as it can stop cattle from my place being stolen. The system that they will use is either the GPS or the GIS tracking system,” he stated.

He further emphasised the need for all communities in the region to be involved in the initiative.

“What is the problem in getting small chips in each of those animals such that you can see the position of all those who stole them. The police will also intercept them and this will bring an end to the current state of affairs in the region,” he said.

Police have now launched operations against armed militiamen who have laid siege to a village in Turkana amid a border dispute between communities.

A day earlier, militiamen surrounding the village of Lorokon, home to the clashing rival Pokot and Turkana communities, seized three police stations and put up heavy resistance against police sent to the area.

According to a statement from the Kenya Red Cross, an estimated 600 to 900 residents of the village are surrounded by Pokot armed men who are said to be numbering over 150.

Two Red Cross teams were in the meantime negotiating with the leaders to get humanitarian access to residents facing a crisis after days spent unable to leave the village.

Trouble began on November 18 after the death of two Pokot, blamed on the Turkana tribe.
Retaliating Pokot then surrounded the village.

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