High stakes for law firm in fresh Mau Mau case

November 21, 2013 2:52 pm
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Kenyan Advocate Cecil Miller who will be acting for Tandem Law in the country also made it clear that claimants will not be required to pay any registration fee either/MIKE KARIUKI
Kenyan Advocate Cecil Miller who will be acting for Tandem Law in the country also made it clear that claimants will not be required to pay any registration fee either/MIKE KARIUKI
NAIROBI, Kenya, Nov 21 – British firm Tandem Law says it will not take any money from the over 8,000 Mau Mau claimants it represents should they be compensated by the British government for atrocities meted by the colonial government.

Lead solicitor Freddie Cosgrove-Gibson who is in the country registering more claimants said their clients will also not be required to pay any legal fees should they fail to secure compensation.

“Tandem Law decided to do these cases on a no win, no fee because we felt very strongly and we believe and are confident that we will be successful,” Gibson said.

Should they lose, Gibson admitted that they would be out a pretty sum, “There has been considerable investment progressing these claims.”

But should they win the defendants who are in this case the British government, would meet their legal costs.

“If you bring a claim on behalf of someone under a no win, no fee and you’re successful then the costs that you have incurred advancing that case are paid by the defendant,” Gibson explained.

Kenyan Advocate Cecil Miller who will be acting for Tandem Law in the country also made it clear that claimants will not be required to pay any registration fee either.

“As far as our case is concerned, nobody on the ground should be asked to pay any money by anyone,” he reiterated.

Only five months ago over 5,000 Mau Mau veterans parted with over Sh150,000 each of their compensation which went to their legal regal representatives Leigh Day.

Gibson also made it clear that unlike Leigh Day which settled out of court, they intend to pursue their case to its logical conclusion.

“There are no behind the door conversations or negotiations. We are preparing to litigate this matter to the end,” he said.

Miller also made it clear that in order to qualify as a claimant, one must have suffered directly at the hands of the colonialists.

“The inquiries we’ve been getting about whether we can make a claim on behalf of my father, my grandfather, I’m sorry unfortunately the case we are handling does not extend to that level,” he explained.

Those who intend to register as claimants will also be required to produce their identification cards and will be taken through a vetting exercise by case workers.

“As Mr Miller said it is not just a case of someone turning up, showing an ID and giving their name. We’ll also be looking for corroborative evidence at the same time,” Gibson explained.

And as the law firm indicated in its November 18 advert, those who register as claimants should also prepare to give testimony having gotten in touch with the lead solicitors before the April 30, 2014 deadline.

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