Students with unpaid exam fees won’t get results

October 31, 2013 2:10 pm
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The council's Chief Executive Officer Paul Wasanga gave an example of 39 candidates of Faith Academy in Nairobi who were allowed to sit the exam after the director of the institution committed to pay the fee and the balance for the 2012 KCSE examination/FILE
The council’s Chief Executive Officer Paul Wasanga gave an example of 39 candidates of Faith Academy in Nairobi who were allowed to sit the exam after the director of the institution committed to pay the fee and the balance for the 2012 KCSE examination/FILE
NAIROBI Kenya, Oct 31 – The Kenya National Examinations Council (KNEC) says students who have not fully paid examination fees will be allowed to sit their exams but they will not receive their results.

The council’s Chief Executive Officer Paul Wasanga gave an example of 39 candidates of Faith Academy in Nairobi who were allowed to sit the exam after the director of the institution committed to pay the fee and the balance for the 2012 KCSE examination.

Wasanga added that the director is yet to honor the agreement.

“The candidates will not get their results. The director came to my office after visiting the Cabinet Secretary and agreed he is going to pay,” Wasanga said.

“He agreed to pay after writing a memorandum which he signed; afterwards I told him to go and pay but instead he disappeared. You must give to Caesar what is Caesar’s.”

Wasanga challenged both parents and candidates to always confirm that they are fully and properly registered with the council before the examination period begins.

“They wait until the last minute to know they have not been registered,” he regretted.

He said all those who are registered are normally uploaded in the council’s website.

Wasanga also said all students were allowed to sit the exams except one case in Meru where a female candidate who gave birth was not allowed to take the examination.

Ahead of the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education exams which are set to start on November 12, Wasanga assured the country that all is set for a total of 844,530 pupils including 906 candidates from Southern Sudan.

Among the candidates 20,000 are below 12 years and as a result the council has announced plans to sensitise parents on the right age of a child to start school.

“This means these children were taken to class one at about three years and if the trend is left unchecked, it has far reaching consequences, as this means that by the time they reach form four they will be 15 years and cannot get an Identity card,” Wasanga argued.

“The official entry requirement for admission to standard one is at six years such that by the time the pupil gets to Standard Eight they are 14 years and 18 years by the time they complete form four.”

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