Misuse of 999 line jamming real emergencies

August 28, 2013 2:00 pm
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The County Police Chief Benson Kibui told Capital FM News the line which was revived recently has been inundated with non-emergency calls/FILE
The County Police Chief Benson Kibui told Capital FM News the line which was revived recently has been inundated with non-emergency calls/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 28 – Police in Nairobi are pleading with members of the public to stop misusing emergency number 999.

The County Police Chief Benson Kibui told Capital FM News the line which was revived recently has been inundated with non-emergency calls.

He said plans are underway to digitize the service in order to record the calls and track down abusers.

He also revealed that since its revival, police have been able to counter some security issues within the city after getting tip offs from the members of the public.

“Some people are having access to this number without ensuring the kind of communication they are having is relevant; this number should not be misused,’ he warned.

“Our officers are manning the number on a 24/7 basis. In the near future we intend to upgrade this number so that it can be digital. It cannot be considered ineffective though since there are those who have alerted us on emergency cases.”

Kibui also said that they have embarked on a programme to increase both civilian and uniformed police officers to curb insecurity cases in the city.

He has urged members of the public to be giving information to the police that may help curb insecurity cases from happening.

“Security starts with you! Coordinate with us by ensuring that any information that you have, you share with us. For the city to prosper, it takes all of us to unite and better our society,” he pointed out.

On the question of whether the city can celebrate as the country heads to 50 years since independence, the police boss said the rates of crime could have increased but noted that the situation is in control.

“Talking of 50 years ago, the county had a lesser population; we are talking of five million residents during the day and four million persons in the night today,” he noted.

“The rate of poverty could also have contributed but the city residents are now aware of their rights unlike those days when they could not report.”

He noted that police have since improved their services.

“We are not blowing our own trumpets, we are doing a good job and Kenyans can attest to that. Run away crime that used to happen has stopped,” he said.

“Communication with the people has also improved and we are able to respond to insecurity cases much faster.”

He said the police were turning digital to enhance security: “As you can see I have a computer and an iPad.”

On response to insecurity cases in the city, Kibui on Tuesday (August 27) convened a meeting of all police bosses in Nairobi County to strategise on ways of fighting the rising cases of hijackings of public service vehicles.

The meeting was attended by all police chiefs in Nairobi as well as officers commanding police stations.

Incidences of attacks on public service vehicles have been on the rise in Nairobi.

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