Jubilee has scored well in 100 days

July 19, 2013 3:46 pm
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Officially sworn into power on April 9, the Jubilee Coalition completed its first 100 days in power opening it to scrutiny on what it has delivered and the challenges it is facing/FILE
Officially sworn into power on April 9, the Jubilee Coalition completed its first 100 days in power opening it to scrutiny on what it has delivered and the challenges it is facing/FILE
NAIROBI Kenya, Jul 19 – The Jubilee government has scored well on its election pledges in the first 100 days in power, according to various stakeholders.

Officially sworn into power on April 9, the Jubilee Coalition completed its first 100 days in power opening it to scrutiny on what it has delivered and the challenges it is facing.

Speaking at a public forum that brought together members of public, politicians and experts in various fields at Kenyatta International Conference Centre on Thursday, Kenya Vision 2030 Director General Mugo Kibati said three months were not enough to gauge an overview performance of the government but urged the citizens to check on its policies.

“The process of moving from the old system of government to the new is unprecedented. The notion of devolution is not one that can be taken rightly, none of us could have anticipated the challenges that we are currently facing,” he observed.

He applauded the government for securing a Cabinet that is highly experienced that include technocrats appointed from either the private sector or promoted from within the civil service.

“The appointments passed the gender test and to a greater extent represented the diversities of the country except perhaps for the youth requirement,” he noted.

“The inclusion of historically marginalised communities of the Somali/Borana with the nomination of three Cabinet Secretaries and three Principal Secretaries from Pokot, Maasai, Teso and Turkana represented a useful elevation of the communities into prominence in the new face of Kenya.”

Another speaker at the forum Godwin Murunga from the Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi however did put the president on the spot for appointing politicians in the Cabinet. “The appointment of politicians who run for electoral office and lost was a small dent on a good start,” he said.

On devolution, Kibati said despite the teething problems of putting a new system (devolution) the country was on the right track. He said conflicts between Governors against County Commissioners or the remaining relics of the provincial administration were misplaced.

“Everyone knows that the Governor is the head of the county while the County Commissioner represents the national government. We cannot do without either of them,” he stated.

In his support, Kisumu senator Prof Anyang Nyong’o said the leaders should stop superiority battles and instead discuss on what role each is playing.

“People should look how things used to be done and compare instead,” Nyong’o said.

Marakwet Senator Kipchumba Murkomen also hailed the government but said devolution challenges were expected saying the country was still in the learning process.

“Credit must go to the president for providing a much needed explanation for his choice to signing into law the Division of Revenue Bill,” he said.

Whether the well being of Kenyans had improved, the government was accused of excessive and misplaced expenditures.

“The hiring of the luxurious jet for the deputy president at unaffordable price was a scar on the government,” Murunga said.

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