Eldoret IDPs upbeat on poll

March 4, 2013 6:44 am
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Ann Wambui who lives in a tattered tent at the Yamumbi Camp near Eldoret Town says what happened in 2007 is sad but that cannot stop her from expressing her constitutional right/CFM
Ann Wambui who lives in a tattered tent at the Yamumbi Camp near Eldoret Town says what happened in 2007 is sad but that cannot stop her from expressing her constitutional right/CFM
ELDORET, Kenya, Mar 4 – Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) living in four camps in Uasin Gishu County have said they are eager to vote despite being in camps for five years after the post election violence.

Ann Wambui who lives in a tattered tent at the Yamumbi Camp near Eldoret Town says what happened in 2007 is sad but that cannot stop her from expressing her constitutional right of choosing the country’s next leaders.

“We voted in 2007, a few days after there was violence. We were displaced and went to Nakuru then we were brought here to Yamumbi. Even though that happened, I will vote. Initially we did not want to vote but we are now convinced it is our right to choose our leaders,” she asserted.

Wambui however hopes the next government will consider their plight and resettle them in places where they can start their lives afresh.

She is also appealing to Kenyans to think of them as they cast their votes or wait for the results and ensure that the route of violence is totally avoided so that they cannot face similar challenges they experienced after the 2007 election.

Diana Njoki another displaced person in the same camp also says she will vote because she is assured of security and peace.

She is also urging other displaced persons to vote since it is their civic duty to do so.

“For five years still we are in camps. The government has made so many promises but we will vote and do it in peace. We pray that the next government will come to our plight. But Kenyans should also ensure peace so that what happened in 2007 is not repeated,” she pleaded.

Yamumbi Camp which is at the Yamumbi Police Station’s Dog Unit land houses 22 families.

In total Uasin Gishu County has 9,800 people still living in camps after the violence that broke out in 2007.

Other families are in the Kamwingi, Sagasaga and Naka camps all in Uasin Gishu County which has over 350,000 voters.

Despite having been in the world limelight for the violence, this time, the county is peaceful and the residents are pledging to remain so despite the outcome of Monday’s election.

The residents mainly Kalenjins and Kikuyus who in 2007 were bitter are determined to anchor on peace and unity among them.

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