New NHIF rates take effect October 1

September 14, 2012 1:52 pm
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“With effect from October 1, 2012 the new rates gazetted on July 2, 2012 will come into effect. This will enable NHIF to receive more contributions from members who will in turn be able to receive both in-patient and out-patient care,” he announced/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Sep 14 – Kenyan workers will from October 1 part with higher National Hospital Insurance Fund (NHIF) contributory rates, after the High Court quashed a petition seeking to stop their implementation.

The new rates will see the highest contributor remit Sh2,000 per month with the least contribution standing at Sh150.

Speaking to journalists in Nairobi on Friday, Medical Services Minister Anyang’ Nyong’o said the new rates would be effected in the coming month as the country seeks to provide quality universal healthcare.

He also noted that the new contributions will allow the NHIF to stretch its coverage and provide outpatient services that would include complex treatments like dialysis.

“With effect from October 1, 2012 the new rates gazetted on July 2, 2012 will come into effect. This will enable NHIF to receive more contributions from members who will in turn be able to receive both in-patient and out-patient care,” he announced.

He argued that the fund had been unable to offer out-patient services due to the current levels of contributions standing at between Sh30 and Sh320.

“Seventy five percent of people who seek healthcare go for out-patient cover and there is no need to have a health insurance scheme which only covers in-patient at 25 percent,” he said.

“In fact, when you have a more robust outpatient cover you reduce the number of people who seek in-patient,” he argued.

“Rwanda which started its equivalent of NHIF in 1998, has 92 percent health coverage. Here in Kenya, and we started in 1966, we have only managed to provide 26 percent,” he observed.

Nyong’o further stressed the need to push for outpatient services citing the reforms that Rwanda had made in providing universal health coverage.

“Rwanda which started its equivalent of NHIF in 1998, has 92 percent health coverage. Here in Kenya, and we started in 1966, we have only managed to provide 26 percent,” he observed.

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