How to make Greek Yogurt at home

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Greek Yogurt is the latest popular diet trend to take over refrigerators all over the world.

Straggisto, or what the rest of the world calls “Greek Yogurt,” is used throughout Greece as a key ingredient for staple dishes like Tzatziki dip. The strained yogurt, made from cow’s milk, is creamy in texture, high in protein, has a rich taste, contains probiotic cultures, and is lower in lactose than regular yogurts.

Greek Yogurt can be used for many dishes, both savory and sweet. Many people use it as a substitute for milk, sour cream and even use it for baking.

When I was on vacation in Greece, I couldn’t get enough of the special Greek Salad made at O!Hamos Tavern (Ω! ΧΑΜΟΣ!), located along the Adamantas Beach. Finished with a liberal dollop of homemade Straggisto, this was certainly the best Greek Salad I’ve ever had in my life. I needed to have it again, somehow.

It turns out that making Greek Yogurt at home is quite easy, as long as you have some leftover natural yogurt (make sure it has live and active cultures)!

How to make Greek Yogurt at home

Use whole, reduced fat, or even skim milk for your homemade Greek Yogurt, but the taste and thickness of the yogurt will differ.

I don’t use freeze-dried yogurt starters because they’re not easily found in Kenyan supermarkets. I just use a few tablespoons of a plain store-bought yogurt. Just always remember to never eat all of your yogurt, and leave some to start your next batch! After a few batches, your Greek Yogurt will be completely organic and be rid of anything processed from your store-bought yogurt.

Mix your milk and starter mixture warm for six to eight hours. The temperature should be around 110°F or 45°C The mixture will become thicker over time. Wait until it gets to a custard consistency. Additional time will increase the tartness of the yogurt. I’ve been using a thermos with towel wrapped around it. An oven set to low temperatures will do as well.
Then allow your mixture to sit in a strainer with two layers of cheesecloth for two hours. Ta-da!

 

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SUSAN WONG

Susan Wong is the Editor of Capital Lifestyle, a resident photographer, an award-winning journalist, radio presenter, full-time adventurer, long-time admirer of anything edible, and a spicy food athlete at Capital FM.

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