This Government is Damn Reckless

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I have always argued among my friends and all that care to listen: We do not need a democratic system of government. We are not yet developed, both socio-economically and intellectually as a people to make serious choices on leadership that stands for ideologies and adheres to the rosy manifestos that are known to create progress. We need a benevolent dictatorship, and I don’t really care how long it may take to finally get one after a series of failures. I would be more at peace with myself if I knew that the buffoon of a leader I have didn’t not boast the legitimacy of a 50%+1 election victory, but rather took over the power by the gun or other less revered revolution. That way, the expectations and frustration would be nil or minimal.
Why do I utter these statements of disgust? I have been watching a government in Kenya, unique for having two centers of real power, preside over utter waste of its citizens lives. Rewind to 2007/2008 period. With a commander-in-chief in office, more than a thousand innocent men, women and children lost their lives and over quarter of a million others were displaced from their homes. This happened as the C-I-C sat in the comfort of his home, helpless or so I think. It took 1000 lives before action was taken. That is the price of a life in Kenya. I don’t even want to dwell on the fact that a significant number of IDPs are still out there, making choices between eating cat or dog meat for dinner.
Fast forward to 2011.It took a democratically elected government, five days to realize that fuel pumps were running dry. According to the Minister of Energy (who happens to be a rather distant neighbor at home), from the little I gleaned from his esoteric blabber before the national TV, admitted that his ministry couldn’t perform its duties due to a powerful cartel of oil marketers. The common man who lights and cooks using kerosene won’t understand this. What government in the world allows a cartel to hold it to ransom? Even the powerful and armed Colombian and Mexican drug cartels feel the true force of their governments. Why can’t we have laws that will drive these cartels out of town drafted by the ministry if the lives of Kenyans don’t make sense to them?
This is the same government that is now begging the Ethiopian government to come and drive out a militia that is 25 kilometers inside its territory after they killed what a certain minister for internal security calls ‘ONLY’ 28 people. Now I think a government of the people needs officials that value even a single life. Why do we have an army holidaying in their barracks with waistlines lengthening every day while our brothers and sisters are massacred in Turkana? This is the same army that leaves bombs bestrewn in a village in Kajiado and promises a mother who has just lost a loved child due to their recklessness, that they are sorry and would not repeat it? How do they intend to compensate these families? Who is responsible and when will he or she resign and commit suicide in shame?
Revelations coming through the parliamentary committee on agriculture show that one of the highest possible level of negligence by any government, that of allowing contaminated food into the market against the advice of its own standards body just because a self-conceited ambassador of the country of origin declared it safe (he would not dare do this in Nigeria where one of the largest American pharmaceutical company paid over 75 million dollars to Kano state for conducting a controversial antibiotic trial among it’s children – talk of national pride), took place two years ago. Do the leaders who chose to fire the CEO of KEBS rather than burn or ship back the maize realize that they are condemning all the consumers of the product to developing serious illnesses like cancer of the liver? How my heart craves a Jerry Rawlings Option. Better still, how I wish the Ministers of Energy, Internal Security, Defence, Industrialization would queue at the highest cliff, and wait for their turn to jump and have the grace to utter the words of the late former President of South Korea just before he committed. “I am in debt to too many people,” “Too many people have suffered because of me. And I cannot imagine the suffering they will go through in the future.”

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  • Great share. I totally agree that people should take their foot off the accelerator to slow down.

  • Boiyot

    I totally agree with you…
    I wish we could just put you up to the task since you already have the idea of the Kenya we want!
    Show us you’ll be selfless though.

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