Be careful, greed obliterates what we value

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There once lived a famous King in a land not so far away from here.  He was known for his great wisdom and generosity surpassing previous rulers of Maua. 

He encouraged and rewarded citizens who worked hard to better the prospects of his kingdom.  But he would also punish the lazy subjects by expelling them to a nearby island called Jangwa, where it was difficult to obtain food.  The banished would slowly wither away and this served as an example of what he expected of his citizens. 

The people of Maua Kingdom flourished in all facets of life.  They had the best education, the best healthcare and produced sufficient food to cater for everyone and put away reserves for harsher times.  Visitors came from far and wide to observe the way the King ruled and how his subjects performed.  The people were happy and soon, there was no need to expel anyone. 

For many years, the King reveled in the accolades of his people.  They sang how the universe had blessed them with a mighty and kind ruler; how they were fortunate to be living in such fruitful times.

As a result of the high standards, the Kingdom produced a people who were bestowed with knowledge and were the envy of their neighbours.  They won awards in virtually every field of the arts and sciences.  But they also began to blow their own trumpets.
 
Trouble also began to brew from within; soon, the King felt threatened by his successful subjects.  He knew his age was catching up with him but he was not ready to let go of the reigns of power.  He had hoped that his son would inherit the kingdom but the young man was years away from adulthood.  So he devised a method to ensure the fruition of his evil plan.
 
He invited all his subjects for a thanksgiving feast and ensured that all acclaimed subjects were in attendance.  Once they had eaten and drank to their full, he called the feast to order.  He then accosted the notable leaders (read potential rivals) individually with claims that they were misusing the resources of the land for their own benefit.  He accused them of being unpatriotic and of treason because they no longer sang praises to him. 

And then his true character began to emerge.  He issued an ultimatum; that they would either surrender their best tools of trade or be banished to Jangwa.  For example, if you were a scientist who used your hands to work, you could offer to have your arm cut off in order to remain on Maua.  Some subjects were not ready to make such enormous sacrifices and were banished to Jangwa.  For those who did, the great and mighty became a symbol of the price of success in the kingdom.

News of the King’s cowardly acts spread to the neighbouring lands like bushfire and his fellow rulers began to dissociate themselves from him.  Visitors no longer came to call on his kingdom, and even if his subjects began to sing his praises again, the words sounded hollow of any meaning. 

I believe that the blood and sweat of sacrifice is the seed of success.  This was the case in Maua kingdom.  Even if the acclaimed leaders lost a great deal, they now had a calling to live for. 

And so it came to be that they organized an uprising that resulted in a civil coup.  But the King had prepared himself adequately and as a result, civil war broke out in Maua.  As with all vagaries of war, Maua was stripped down to a shell of its former self.  It is no wonder that we no longer hear praises of Maua, the great Kingdom. 

As we approach Christmas and the New Year, I urge you to remember Maua the great Kingdom.  Let us remind our leaders that greed has the potential to obliterate all that we have achieved so far.  We tripped and fell on our greed and pride in early 2008, but it is not too late to learn our lesson.
 
Our country belongs to the masses and not to an acclaimed few.  If greed is your driving force in leading the Kenyan people and in the struggle for a new constitution, then perhaps you ought to step down before it consumes you. 

But if you are truly driven by our greater good, then you must also be willing to endure enormous sacrifice for Kenya to triumph.  The question for all of us remains; what are you willing to sacrifice?

May God bless our leaders as we continue to look upon them for guidance. 
I wish many more blessed tidings to you my fellow Kenyans, listeners of Capital Fm, cherished friends and loved ones in Kenya and abroad.
 

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