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What Recent Graduates Should Not To Ask During An Interview

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After completing your university education,  many begin to disseminate the curriculum vitae with their degree in hand, to different organizations. Hopeful of the possibility of being shortlisted for an interview, the stakes are high with Kenya’s unemployment rates at 35% for the youth.

Before stepping into any organization, one must be aware of the appropriate interview etiquette that could very well have one gain or lose a lucrative opportunity. There are a couple of questions any interviewee should not ask, if they intend to have a chance at gaining a position in any organization.

 

Here are three questions graduates should never ask at interviews:

 

1.What does this position pay?

Unless the query is raised by the interviewer which rarely happens at the first stage of the interview, matters of salary should not be mentioned. So, when should one ask this question? The response is simple. Once you’ve been offered the job, or at the second or third round of interviews. This question is also best posed to the Human Resource Manager and not anyone else. Being too keen on the salary could indicate that the interviewee is more interested in the income than the company they intend to work for, so always be cautious when presenting this question.

 

2.How many hours in a day should I work?

No organization hopes to employ workers who are less than diligent. Asking about reporting hours at the first round of interviews indicates that an interviewee is unlikely to have a great work ethic. If you have some concerns like you are unable to come to work early; it is better to seek advice about the organizations’ operation during work days at the second interview.

 

3.Did I get the job?

There are several ways of knowing if you’ve qualified for the job in any organization. In most cases, the chosen candidate will get a call confirming they have gotten the position. It is definitely a faux pas for an interviewee to repeatedly call an organization inquiring if they got the job.

 

This article was written by Capital Campus Correspondent Willie Blair.

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