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In a photo provided by NASA a United Launch Alliance Atlas V with TDRS-L atop, arrives at the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Fla., Air Force Station's Launch Complex 41. The unmanned rocket is set to blast off Thursday night, Jan. 23, 2014, with the latest, third-generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellite/AFP

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NASA launches communications satellite

In a photo provided by NASA a United Launch Alliance Atlas V with TDRS-L atop, arrives at the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Fla., Air Force Station's Launch Complex 41. The unmanned rocket is set to blast off Thursday night, Jan. 23, 2014, with the latest, third-generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellite/AFP

In a photo provided by NASA a United Launch Alliance Atlas V with TDRS-L atop, arrives at the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Fla., Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 41. The unmanned rocket is set to blast off Thursday night, Jan. 23, 2014, with the latest, third-generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellite/AFP

WASHINGTON, January 24- NASA on Thursday launched a new satellite to boost its growing communications network between Earth and the International Space Station, allowing for nearly uninterrupted video, voice link and data transmission.

The TDRS-L rocket blasted off at 9:33 pm (0233 GMT Friday) from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on its way to become the 11th member of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System.

One hour and 46 minutes later, the 3.45 tonne satellite designed to work for 15 years separated from the second stage of the rocket, NASA tweeted.

It will now spend the next 11 days adjusting into its definitive geostationary orbit.

The fleet of satellites has “revolutionized communications” for NASA “by allowing nearly continuous transmission of information during a mission,” the agency said.

The first TDRS satellite was launched in 1983.

Before then, communications to space were spotty and based on a small number of ground stations worldwide, leaving many gaps.

“Astronauts and Earth orbiting scientific spacecraft would relay messages only when they passed over or near one of the ground stations,” said NASA.

Now, the network of TDRS satellites combines to convey near continuous signals, information and commands from ground controllers to the International Space Station as well the Hubble Space Telescope and a range of scientific satellites.

The satellite blasted off atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, destined for an orbit 22,300 miles (35,900 kilometers) above the Earth.

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