Graft to be fought by all means including the word of God-Wabukala

February 1, 2017 5:10 pm
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This was announced on Wednesday after a meeting of religious leaders and the new Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission Chairperson Retired Anglican Archbishop Eliud Wabukala, who says corruption is largely a moral problem/CFM NEWS
NAIROBI, Kenya, Feb 1 – In what seems to be a move to address the problem from its roots, the fight against corruption will now be scaled down to all levels of the society and more so within religious institutions.

This was announced on Wednesday after a meeting of religious leaders and the new Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission Chairperson Retired Anglican Archbishop Eliud Wabukala, who says corruption is largely a moral problem.

“They (religious leaders) have shown that they are going to cooperate and they have taken this as their own problem,” he stated.

Inter-Religious Council of Kenya Adan Wachu – who read a statement on the behalf of his counterparts – says they have offered to partner with EACC since corruption can only be won through a multi-faceted strategy, that will see all players involved.

He has expressed confidence that the move will not only bear positive outcome but will also restore the faded confidence among Kenyans, in the fight that has left massive public resources embezzled.

“We recognise that corruption is an evil which continues to shatter the moral fabric of the nation; and it must be fought by all means available including the word of God,” he stated.

“To this extent, the faiths based sector will work closely with EACC and other stakeholders in tackling corruption and unethical conduct in Kenya with a view to nurturing a society where all people embrace integrity in their public and private endeavours.”

Wachu urged Kenyans to join the anti-graft body in fighting the menace while insisting that it was the duty of all to ensure tax payers money is effectively utilized.

He said EACC, an organization with about 600 employees cannot be expected to serve over 45 million Kenyans on its own.

“The attacks against the Commission and the politicization of the war must stop,” he said. “We must reason together as leaders and Kenyans, and deal with the problem without fear and favour,” he asserted.

We have firmly resolved and committed that as leaders in the religious sector, we shall continue to use our respective places of worship to condemn corruption and lead our faithful towards discovering God’s position and His direction on living a life full of integrity.

We will also actively participate in changing the narrative from mere talk about corruption to taking both personal and collective responsibility in preventing and combating it in all our spheres of life. Corruption is a moral issue and the religious leaders as preachers on morality we commit to support and partner with EACC in the fight against corruption.”

The religious leaders did not however the practical measures they are going to adopt to fight the menace.

Religious institutions have in the past been on spot for receiving funds whose source is questionable.

On the other hand, EACC has been struggling to convince Kenyans on how successful they have been, away from the dramatic arrests of suspects.

Currently, EACC is probing tens of cases involving billions of shillings that are suspected to have been wrongly used though the process has always been described as sluggish.

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