CJ interviews begin for previously excluded candidates

September 5, 2016 7:00 am
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So far, six candidates have been interviewed for the post with a total of nine to go/CFM NEWS
So far, six candidates have been interviewed for the post with a total of nine to go/CFM NEWS

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Sep 5 – Paul Andrew Kongani Udoto Kongani is due to be interviewed by the Judicial Service Commission (JSC) Monday in the second week of interviews for the post of Chief Justice.

Kongani is a law student at the Kenya School of Law and is one of the seven applicants the JSC had left out in the initial shortlist.

Overview
  • Kongani is a law student at the Kenya School of Law and is one of the seven applicants the JSC had left out in the initial shortlist.
  • So far, six candidates have been interviewed for the post with a total of nine to go.
  • On Saturday, Supreme Court Judge Smokin Wanjala was interviewed where he stated that he will not want to sit on a presidential petition again due to the criticism that follows.

So far, six candidates have been interviewed for the post with a total of nine to go.

On Saturday, Supreme Court Judge Smokin Wanjala was interviewed where he stated that he will not want to sit on a presidential petition again due to the criticism that follows.

He had further pointed out that he will cut down on too much consultations within the Judiciary if appointed to the post since it delayed the decision making process.

He had also stated that he has never heard of cartels within the institution but should he encounter them during his tenure as Chief Justice, he will deal with them decisively.

During the vetting, Wanjala stated that no one has ever approached him in a bid to influence a decision but emphasised that he would not compromise his oath.

He pointed out that the destruction of such cartels within the judiciary will take first priority if he is appointed to the post.

The Supreme Court judge further indicated that his religion as a Catholic would never interfere with his decisions since the constitution remains supreme.

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