Japan wants Africa to get permanent UN Security Council seat

August 27, 2016 1:55 pm
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He says with the security challenges affecting the continent just like other parts of the world, Africa having a member at the UN Security Council is long overdue/CFM NEWS
He says with the security challenges affecting the continent just like other parts of the world, Africa having a member at the UN Security Council is long overdue/CFM NEWS

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 27 – Japan has promised to support Africa in lobbying to be a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council by the year 2023.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says Africa has the right to demand this from the international community for her views to be easily heard and have a say in decision making at the Council.

“The enormous continent of Africa has no permanent member to the United Nations Security Council. Agenda 2063 states clearly that by 2023, it will rectify this situation. Please accept my complete support on this point, “Abe said.

He says with the security challenges affecting the continent just like other parts of the world, Africa having a member at the UN Security Council is long overdue.

He adds that strong Africa representation will also ensure reforms at the Council.

“You in Africa have a right as a matter of course to demand that the international community better reflect your views. Africa should send a permanent member to the United Nations Security Council by 2023 at the very latest,” he emphasised.

At the moment, more than 60 United Nations member states have never been Members of the Security Council.

The current permanent members are China, France, Russia Federation, United Kingdom and the United States of America.

A state which is a Member of the United Nations but not of the Security Council may participate in its discussions when the Council considers that country’s interests but cannot vote.

Both members and non-members of the United Nations, if they are parties to a dispute being considered by the Council, may be invited to take part in the Council’s discussions, without a vote.

The Council sets the conditions for participation by a non-member state.

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