High Court to hear DPP’s plea against release of Briton in Cocaine case

August 9, 2016 9:17 am
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The DPP had challenged the bond terms issued by a magistrate's court in Kibera Monday, arguing that the charges facing Marrian and Roy Mwanthi attract hefty sentences. Mwanthi was granted a Sh60 million bond with two Kenyan sureties/FILE
The DPP had challenged the bond terms issued by a magistrate’s court in Kibera Monday, arguing that the charges facing Marrian and Roy Mwanthi attract hefty sentences. Mwanthi was granted a Sh60 million bond with two Kenyan sureties/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 9 – The High Court will on Tuesday morning hear an application by the Director of Public Prosecutions seeking cancellation of a Sh70 million bond granted to a British aristocrat’s son Jack Marrian who is facing charges of trafficking 100 kilograms of Cocaine alongside a Kenyan.

The DPP had challenged the bond terms issued by a magistrate’s court in Kibera Monday, arguing that the charges facing Marrian and Roy Mwanthi attract hefty sentences. Mwanthi was granted a Sh60 million bond with two Kenyan sureties.

High Court judge Luka Kimaru had Monday evening suspended the bond terms issued earlier in the day at the request of the DPP and directed that the matter be heard Tuesday morning for further directions.

Defence lawyer Sheetal Kapila told AFP he believed the case was driven by the authorities’ desire “to stop Kenya being a transit point” for drugs, but in this case, “it’s the wrong man who’s been picked up.”

“Unknown people have smuggled this drug into the consignment,” Kapila said.
Marrian’s case has caused a sensation in his native Britain, where the aristocratic background of his mother Lady Emma Clare Campbell of Cawdor and his attendance at top private schools, including the alma mater of Prince William’s wife Catherine, have caught the eye of the press.

His family’s relationship with Kenya dates back decades, his lawyer said, as Marrian’s grandfather served as a minister in the colonial government just before independence in 1963.

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