Will the Dutch follow Britain out the door?

June 27, 2016 6:30 am
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With Dutch MPs gearing up to debate this week the seismic impact of the Brexit vote, the fallout is set to dominate the political scene ahead of elections due in March/AFP
With Dutch MPs gearing up to debate this week the seismic impact of the Brexit vote, the fallout is set to dominate the political scene ahead of elections due in March/AFP

, THE HAGUE, Netherlands, Jun 27 – Britain’s vote to leave the EU has sent shockwaves across the Netherlands, a founding father of the European community, but despite a push by eurosceptics analysts say a “Nexit” referendum is unlikely soon, if ever.

“Now it is our turn,” trumpeted Geert Wilders, the leader of the anti-Islam far-right Freedom Party (PVV), just after the results landed.

Overview
  • "Now it is our turn," trumpeted Geert Wilders, the leader of the anti-Islam far-right Freedom Party (PVV), just after the results landed.
  • With Dutch MPs gearing up to debate this week the seismic impact of the Brexit vote, the fallout is set to dominate the political scene ahead of elections due in March.
  • How it is viewed in this small trading nation of 17 million people - which unlike Britain is part of the eurozone - may largely depend on the kind of deal the Brits get as they head out the door.
  • Wilders has promised to make a referendum on a "Nexit" a central plank of his party's election campaign.

With Dutch MPs gearing up to debate this week the seismic impact of the Brexit vote, the fallout is set to dominate the political scene ahead of elections due in March.

How it is viewed in this small trading nation of 17 million people – which unlike Britain is part of the eurozone – may largely depend on the kind of deal the Brits get as they head out the door.

Wilders has promised to make a referendum on a “Nexit” a central plank of his party’s election campaign.

And he is already eyeing the premiership, with polls having consistently shown in recent months that the PVV could emerge the largest party in the 150-seat parliament, although not with a majority.

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