Religion should promote peace and tolerance – Muturi

June 3, 2016 11:42 am
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“We should start by the basic humility. That study point of faith is not being so full of ourselves; that you are right and God only speaks to us and not to others”/PSCU
“We should start by the basic humility. That study point of faith is not being so full of ourselves; that you are right and God only speaks to us and not to others”/PSCU

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Jun 3 – Kenyans have been urged to use the diverse religious faiths in the country to promote tolerance and unity among all citizens.

National Assembly Speaker Justin Muturi says religion should not be used to promote hatred.

Overview
  • National Assembly Speaker Justin Muturi says religion should not be used to promote hatred but peace and tolerance among Kenyans.
  • “As people of faith, we are summoned to push against those who try to distort our religion and religions,” he said at the National Prayer Breakfast in Nairobi Friday.
  • “In today’s world, for example, when hate groups have their own Twitter accounts and other forms technology in the cyber space, it can even be harder to counter attack such intolerance, but God compels us to try,” Muturi urged.

“As people of faith, we are summoned to push against those who try to distort our religion and religions,” he said at the National Prayer Breakfast in Nairobi Friday.

Besides other ideological issues, terrorist are known of using religion to advance their evil schemes.

“In today’s world, for example, when hate groups have their own Twitter accounts and other forms of technology in the cyber space, it can even be harder to counter attack such intolerance, but God compels us to try,” Muturi urged.

“We should start by the basic humility. That study point of faith is not being so full of ourselves; that you are right and God only speaks to us and not to others.”

A case study on what the Speaker is advocating for is an incident where a Muslim teacher sustained several gunshot wounds and eventually succumbed while shielding Christians during a bus attack in Mandera.

Sala Farah was shot after refusing to be separated from Christian passengers during an Al Shabaab attack on a bus travelling from Mandera to Nairobi in December 2015.

He later succumbed to his wounds, leaving behind four young children aged between two and 10, and a pregnant wife.

Farah has since been awarded the Order of the Grand Warrior of Kenya by President Uhuru Kenyatta “in recognition of his remarkable act of valour”.

The award is given by the president to acclaim “distinguished and outstanding services rendered to the nation in various capacities and responsibilities”.

“He died defending people he did not know. This is because he believed in their right to freedom of worship and he knew that every single life – irrespective of faith – is sacred,” President Kenyatta said during the State of Nation address in parliament.

“He is a powerful symbol of our country’s ambition to attain the full expression of secure and cohesive nationhood, and he is a costly reminder that we all have a role to play in protecting our freedoms.”

The prayers come as political leaders in the country continue to engage on various pertinent issues which include electoral reforms ahead of 2017 General Election, the fight against graft among others.

Muturi urged Kenyans of faith to dedicate the country before God, for unity, reconciliation and prosperity to be realised.

“Whatever our traditions or beliefs, we must seek to be instrument of peace by bringing light where there is darkness, sowing love where there is hatred and render justice, mercy and compassion to the most vulnerable,” he said.

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