NTSA wants checks on private cars to curb emissions

May 30, 2016 3:26 pm
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He was speaking during a forum on carbon emissions where he explained that inspections will be done every two years and non-compliant cars will be banned from the roads/FILE
He was speaking during a forum on carbon emissions where he explained that inspections will be done every two years and non-compliant cars will be banned from the roads/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, May 30 – The National Transport and Safety Authority (NTSA) is seeking to introduce mandatory inspection for private vehicles which are four years and above by November this year.

Speaking to Capital FM News, NTSA Chairman Lee Kinyanjui indicated that this is part of an initiative seeking to reduce carbon emissions and pointed out that inspected vehicles will have stickers to show they are compliant.

He was speaking during a forum on carbon emissions where he explained that inspections will be done every two years and non-compliant cars will be banned from the roads.

Overview
  • “We want to introduce motor vehicle inspection for private cars which are four years and above. This inspection will be done every two years. This is a matter that is still in the public domain but essentially before the end of this year, we want to get it rolling,” he stated.
  • He also explained that this will also reduce the risk of respiratory diseases as a result of the saturation of carbon gases in the atmosphere.
  • “In Kenya we have not been inspecting private vehicles but we have said that from this year we want to start inspecting them with the sole aim to ensuring that they are compliant and more so with regard to emissions,” he said.

“We want to introduce motor vehicle inspection for private cars which are four years and above. This inspection will be done every two years. This is a matter that is still in the public domain but essentially before the end of this year, we want to get it rolling,” he stated.

He also explained that this will also reduce the risk of respiratory diseases as a result of the saturation of carbon gases in the atmosphere.

“In Kenya we have not been inspecting private vehicles but we have said that from this year we want to start inspecting them with the sole aim to ensuring that they are compliant and more so with regard to emissions,” he said.

“Where we are today, we really have to look at some of these regarding emissions because before long as a nation, we will have to pay very dearly for the mistakes or the omissions that we have done in the past.”

NTSA further reiterated the need for Public Service Vehicle (PSV) Operators to be issued with contracts.

Kinyanjui said if implemented, this will ensure both drivers and conductors have job security and hence no need to ‘rush’ to make money.

He pointed out that this will discourage overlapping on roads and reduce congestion.

“First of all they get more job assurance… they feel more secure. The other thing is that this idea of being paid on a daily basis is what is contributing to the breaking of the law because I want to rush to make as many trips as possible so that over and above what I am required by the owner to give, what I make in excess is mine. That is what we want to discourage,” he said.

He pointed out that this is part of initiatives by NTSA as it seeks to restore sanity on Kenyan roads.

“I think this is something that has been there and if you look at the PSV regulations 2014, one of the things is that these drivers are supposed to be on a term contract as opposed to being paid on a daily basis. We are doing these reforms to see the industry to the next level.”

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