South Sudan’s peace deal hangs by a thread

April 23, 2016 10:30 am
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Machar was due to return to the capital on Monday to take up the post of first vice president alongside arch-rival President Salva Kiir, and his failure to arrive has put an August 2015 peace agreement in jeopardy/FILE
Machar was due to return to the capital on Monday to take up the post of first vice president alongside arch-rival President Salva Kiir, and his failure to arrive has put an August 2015 peace agreement in jeopardy/FILE

, JUBA, South Sudan, Apr 23 – In a country awash with guns, a faltering peace deal aimed at ending over two years of intense civil war in South Sudan came down to a dispute over just two dozen weapons.

The issue, while apparently minor, reflects the huge mistrust between the rival leaders, and is a sign of the massive challenges faced when – or if – rebel chief Riek Machar finally returns to the city and forges a unity government.

“Both sides are very deeply suspicious,” said veteran South Sudanese journalist Alfred Taban, editor of the independent Juba Monitor newspaper.

Overview
  • The latest stumbling block to his return concerned the number of machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades that rebel troops protecting Machar would be allowed to carry.
  • Diplomats said it was "almost unbelievable" that a deal to end a war in which tens of thousands have died could rest on such a difference.
  • Rebels finally accepted proposals by international mediators that they could hold 20 of each weapon, but when talks broke late Thursday the government insisted on only seven.

“But people are just sick of war. People are looking for some sanity.”

Machar was due to return to the capital on Monday to take up the post of first vice president alongside arch-rival President Salva Kiir, and his failure to arrive has put an August 2015 peace agreement in jeopardy.

The latest stumbling block to his return concerned the number of machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades that rebel troops protecting Machar would be allowed to carry.

Diplomats said it was “almost unbelievable” that a deal to end a war in which tens of thousands have died could rest on such a difference.

Rebels finally accepted proposals by international mediators that they could hold 20 of each weapon, but when talks broke late Thursday the government insisted on only seven.

The government accepted the deal on Friday, after threats of being reported to the UN Security Council.

UN chief Ban Ki-moon urged Machar to return to Juba “without delay”, while the US, UK and Norway in a joint statement demanded he return by Saturday.

However, Minister of Information Michael Makuei said Monday was more likely, as ceasefire teams must verify the weapons first.

But diplomats also noted gloomily that while Machar’s return is the “best chance yet”, it only sees the country go back to the status quo that existed before his July 2013 sacking that precipitated the war.

“Now the economy is also broken and there’s two years’ worth of division on top,” one diplomat said.

J. Peter Pham from the Washington-based Atlantic Council think tank, called the deal a “forced marriage that the international community is dragging both men kicking and screaming towards” amid fear of possible sanctions.

South Sudan’s civil war began in December 2013 when Kiir accused Machar of plotting a coup.

The conflict has torn open ethnic divisions and been characterised by human rights violations.

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