US doctors perform first HIV-to-HIV liver transplant

March 30, 2016 8:45 pm
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Similar HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant operations have already taken place in South Africa/XINHUA-File
Similar HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant operations have already taken place in South Africa/XINHUA-File

, MIAMI, United States, Mar 30 – The world’s first liver transplant from a donor infected with HIV to an HIV-positive recipient was announced Wednesday by US doctors, three years after a US ban on such operations was overturned.

The procedure involved a deceased donor whose liver was transplanted into a patient who had been infected with the virus that causes AIDS more than 20 years ago, said doctors at Johns Hopkins University.

Overview
  • The procedure involved a deceased donor whose liver was transplanted into a patient who had been infected with the virus that causes AIDS more than 20 years ago, said doctors at Johns Hopkins University.
  • The same donor also gave her kidney to another patient for transplant.
  • "A couple of weeks ago we performed the first HIV-to-HIV liver transplant in the world, and the first HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant in the United States," Dorry Segev, professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins Medicine, told a press conference.

The same donor also gave her kidney to another patient for transplant.

“A couple of weeks ago we performed the first HIV-to-HIV liver transplant in the world, and the first HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant in the United States,” Dorry Segev, professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins Medicine, told a press conference.

Similar HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant operations have already taken place in South Africa.

“This is a very exciting day for us,” Segev added.

“But it is really only the beginning.”

Both patients – whose identities were not revealed – are recovering well from their operations, the medical team said.

The kidney transplant patient has already left the hospital.

The donor’s name was not released, but her family issued a statement describing her as a “very boisterous soul” who fought for justice.

“She was a daughter, a mother, an auntie, best friend and sister,” it said.

“She was able to leave this world helping those underdogs she fought so hard for.”

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